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June 24, 2022

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On the road across Texas…

June 24, 2022

First Day of the Trip (Greenville-Dallas-Waco)

First Day of the Trip (Greenville-Dallas-Waco)

Needing some inspiration for traveling this summer? Then look no further than in the archives! From maps to travel guides, postcards to posters, diaries to scrapbooks, there are a variety of resources to guides your plans. So plug in that hybrid vehicle, and grab something to take notes. For those looking to venture down to the coast, then this Texas Album – Start Greenville, provides the perfect trip itinerary.

“Lib” and Glen started out their summer travels in Greenville, Texas in June 1922. The first leg of their journey included stops in Dallas, Hillsboro (for lunch) before they spent the night in Waco. This travel album comprises many photographs and annotations by the creator, postcards, maps, and small ephemera. While in Dallas they explored the Fair Grounds, the Jefferson and various streets in town.

The second leg of the trip took them to Austin, where for two days they visited the Capitol grounds, and the law building at the University of Texas.

Scene at Deep Eddy, Austin

Scene at Deep Eddy, Austin

They describe the scene at Deep Eddy as “one of Austin’s good swimming holes.” After Austin, the third leg of their trip brought them to San Antonio (after passing through Buda, San Marcos, and New Braunfels) where they spent another two days. “Lib” and Glen explored various swimming holes, fishing, and did some sightseeing. They saw missions, the Alamo, and Brackenridge Park. While in town they stayed in the Gunter Hotel. The Gunter opened on November 20, 1909, on the site of the earlier Mahncke Hotel. The hotel was built by the San Antonio Hotel Company and named for Jot Gunter, a local rancher and real estate developer who was one of its financiers.

4th leg of the trip

4th leg of the trip

The fourth leg of the trip took the couple through Karnes City, Kennedy, Cuero, Yorktown, Victoria, and Edna. However, a muddy spot in the road caused a traffic jam. “Cars stuck to the rear of us; cars stuck ahead of us. Nothing to do but sit in the car until daylight.” After getting unstuck, they arrived in Houston. In addition to images of their muddy ride, photographs of this leg of the journey show various scenes of Rice University including the main building, the Power building, and the boy’s dormitory.

Finally, the last leg of the road trip brought “Lib” and Glen to Galveston. They drove around the sea wall, and participated in the Crystal Plunge. They swam, they fished, and enjoyed the sites and scenes of Galveston.

Bathing Girl Revue, Galveston

Bathing Girl Revue, Galveston

Crystal Plunge

Crystal Plunge

 

 

 

"Lib" and Glen

“Lib” and Glen

 

This album is one of many featured in the exhibition “Send Me a Postcard! Women on the Road across 19th-20th Century America,” which examines women motorists/automobilists and their travels across the country.

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing these materials. “Send me a Postcard! Women on the road across 19th-20th century America” will be on display in the Hillcrest exhibit hall through August 2022. View additional materials in the companion digital exhibit. The DeGolyer continues to expand our digitization efforts, adding new content weekly. We have thousands of items digitized and searchable in our digital collections with many thousands more

Send me a postcard!

May 5, 2022

Send me a postcard exhibit banner

Send me a postcard exhibit banner

 

On exhibition this summer in the DeGolyer Library’s Hillcrest Hall Send me a postcard! Women on the road across 19th-20th century America examines women motorists/automobilists and their travels across the country. The concept for this exhibit developed from a series of blog posts written over the course of a few summers. “That’s Where the West Begins…” featured the Elizabeth Dalrymple manuscript. Filled with humorous adventures, Elizabeth’s narrative describes her road trip from Pennsylvania to Colorado and back with her girlfriends Lillian, Aldine, Ethel in June 1940. The follow-up post “On the Road Again” featured the Margaret Burkhalder’s scrapbook, which contains a travel journal and diary, postcards, clippings, programs, and ephemera from a five-week trip from Buffalo, New York to the Midwest and Western United States and Canada with a group of nurses from Buffalo General Hospital, June 11 to July 14, 1936.

The open road stood as a symbol of freedom. It offered women means of exploration and an opportunity to become rugged adventurers. Automobiles started to appear at the same time women were striving for autonomy in the home and in politics. Women’s growing independence and the suffrage movement coincided with the rise of the motoring. To set out on the road required a sense of adventure and determination, an ability to cope with at times harsh conditions, and the know-how to troubleshoot repairs or problem-solve.

A woman’s world tour in a motor cover

A woman’s world tour in a motor cover

Highlights from the exhibit include: Harriet White Fisher’s (1865-1939) A woman’s world tour in a motor. Harriet White Fisher Andrew was an American known for being the first woman to circle the globe in a Locomobile. Alice Huyler Ramsey’s (1886-1983) Veil, duster and tire iron provides a description of an automobile trip from New York to San Francisco. Alice Huyler Ramsey was the first woman to drive an automobile across the United States from coast to coast, a feat she completed on August 7, 1909. Ramsey became the first woman inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame on October 17, 2000.

Newly acquired materials from the DeGolyer can also been seen in this exhibit. Elizabeth Albertha Taylor’s Western Wonderland [privately printed account of a western trip], 1903 recounts a western journey of a group of women beginning in Denver with sightseeing. The group then made their way to Manitou; Cheyenne Canyon for a “botany expedition”; Pike’s Peak; Garden of the Gods; and Glenwood Springs where they celebrated Fourth of July. They went on to stay at Yellowstone. Her account is an illustrated diary which includes many photographs of scenery and towns, as well as photos of the group and their activities.

“Safety First on Your Trip to California”

“Safety First on Your Trip to California”

Henrietta Heacock’s Safety First on Your Trip to California was created for Elisabeth by Henrietta, as a present for a girl’s trip by train to California. The entire book was compiled from different periodicals’ humorous clippings, cartoons, and illustrations, combined to form chapters. Some of the chapter headings: “The Way to Travel,” “The Gateway to the West,” “Are You an Optimist.” The album allowed Elisabeth (and future owners) to enjoy contemporary “railroad humor” while passing the time. It is a valuable reflection of railroad culture in American life.

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing these materials. “Send me a Postcard! Women on the road across 19th-20th century America” will be on display in the Hillcrest exhibit hall through August 2022. View additional materials in the companion digital exhibit. The DeGolyer continues to expand our digitization efforts, adding new content weekly.


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