Carrera Por La Vida (Race for Life)

October 13, 2021

Carrera por la vida race bib, 1998 March 8

Nancy Brinker founded the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation on July 22, 1982 in Dallas, Texas, in her sister’s memory. Headquartered in Dallas, Texas, the organization searches for an end to breast cancer. In 1983 the first Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure® took place in Dallas, Texas, with 800 participants.

Costa Rica become the first country outside of the United States to host a Race for the Cure event. The inspiration for the event came from former U.S. Ambassador to Costa Rica (1994-1998), Sonia Picado. An advocate for women’s health issues, Picado was an ardent support of the Race for the Cure in Washington DC. The race took place in La Sabana National Park in San José, Costa Rica on March 8, 1998.

Race participants

The goals of the race were to spread the message of early detection, and to raise funds to improve breast cancer education, screening, and treatment programs. At the time, breast cancer accounted for the second highest mortality rate of cancer for women in Costa Rica. Over 3,500 participated in the event, with funds raised from the event going towards Fundeso, the National Foundation for Solidarity Against Breast Cancer. Created in 1983 by Elena Sikora, a cancer survivor herself, this non-profit organization is run by volunteers, mostly cancer survivors, who fight cancer through early detection, prompt and effective medical intervention, and rehabilitation programs.

Women of Fundeso, recipient of the race funds

Housed in the DeGolyer Library are the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation records, 1983-2011, and the Susan G. Komen papers. The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation records consist of papers, photographs, clippings, company publications, awards, and artifacts along with an additional terabyte of digital video, photograph, and document files related to the development of affiliate Komen programs and races around the world.

Race for the Cure volunteers

Race for the Cure volunteers

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing the collections.

For access to these collections or to learn more about the adventurous women of the southwest, be sure to visit the DeGolyer Library and check out our books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and photographs.

135 years of the State Fair of Texas

September 20, 2021

The State Fair of Texas begins its 135th year this week in Dallas. In 1886 it was originally called the Dallas State Fair and Exposition, and by 1905 the annual event at Fair Park became the State Fair of Texas. The pandemic did not allow a full fair experience in 2020, but it wasn’t the first time Texans missed their annual celebration. The fair was cancelled in 1918 and 1942-1945 due to war, and in 1935 to prepare for the Texas Centennial exposition in 1936. This year promises to bring back exhibits, entertainment, college football, and great food.

 

DeGolyer Library has books, photographs, and manuscript collections relating to the State Fair of Texas. Our large cookbook collection includes annual cookbooks of winning recipes:

State Fair of Texas cook books

State Fair of Texas cook books

 

Memorabilia can be found in the George W. Cook Dallas/Texas manuscripts and artifacts collection. Here is a sample of the opening day pins, employee and guest badges, and programs:

State Fair of Texas pins

 

 

 

 

 

State Fair of Texas guest pins

 

State Fair of Texas programs

State Fair of Texas programs

 

Dozens of tickets from the George W. Cook Dallas/Texas manuscripts and artifacts collection have been digitizedPhotographs and postcards related to Fair Park are also available in the George W. Cook Dallas/Texas Image Collection. Photographer Lynn Lennon documented the State Fair in the 1980s and her work is available in our digital collection.

[Swing ride, State Fair of Texas]

[Swing ride, State Fair of Texas], Lynn Lennon photographs, Ag2002.1405

 

Please contact degolyer@smu.edu for questions about State Fair of Texas materials in DeGolyer Library.

 

Sources:

George W. Cook Dallas/Texas manuscripts and artifacts, MSS 123. Finding aid available at https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/taro/smu/00307/smu-00307.html

George W. Cook Dallas/Texas image collection, Ag2014.0011. Finding aid available at https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/taro/smu/00306/smu-00306.html

Lynn Lennon photographs, Ag2002.1405. Digital Collection. Finding aid available at http://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/taro/smu/00375/smu-00375.html

State Fair of Texas prize winning recipes. Dallas, 1974. Gift of Jiaan Powers, 2009. TX715.P433 1974

State Fair of Texas prize winning recipes. Dallas, 1986. Gift of George Anne Myers, 2006. TX715.P433 1986

State Fair of Texas prize winning recipes. Dallas, 1993. Gift of George Anne Myers, 2006. TX715.P433 1993

Townsend Times

September 8, 2021

Image of Clara Virginia Townsend, undated

Image of Clara Virginia Townsend, undated

Clara Virginia Townsend was a teacher in Fulton, Missouri and Kansas City, an early feminist and writer. Her columns were published in Youth’s Companion, The Ladies World (New York), The Kansas City star, and other newspapers. This author’s personal scrapbook of her published works includes many columns entitled “Back talk to girls by Naomi Wantmore,” and a speech about women’s rights addressed to the Alumnae of Synodical Female College (1895).

Townsend was born September 28, 1857, in Fulton, the daughter of Eli and Margaret (Kelley) Townsend. She attended public schools and graduated from Synodical College with highest honors in 1877. In 1887 she was granted a state certificate by the Superintendent of Schools. Townsend taught for over fifty years.

Mollie's Valentine

Mollie’s Valentine

 

 

 

In addition to teaching she found time and talent for writing. Few writers are so fortunate as to have their very first story accepted by a major periodical, but this was the case for Townsend, whose work “Mollie’s Valentine” appeared in the publication Youth’s Companion. According to Literary Honors, “Miss Townsend possesses an individuality of style that insures her success in the literary world.”

 

 

 

 

She Declares Herself

She Declares Herself

 

 

Townsend’s poetry and prose centered on education, teachers, and women’s rights. In “She Declares Herself,” Townsend wrote of the woman’s sphere, and encouraged all women to break out.

“Farewell the timid ones who fear to tread at dusk or eve in their native city’s street; welcome the woman who in self-reliance can circumnavigate the globe alone…our place is what we choose; our sphere the world.”

 

 

 

 

 

The Dream of an Average Teacher

The Dream of an Average Teacher

 

 

And what teacher cannot relate to Townsend’s poem “The Dream of the Average Teacher”?

“Sleep no more, examination grades have murdered sleep!…and last there came a creature wan and pale who said, ‘Behold me, wretch! I was a parent. Full many a time and oft in days gone by my little boy that I esteemed so bright by your relentless hand was graded zero’…I would not pass another such a night for all the salary of a high school teacher. My friends, I bid you shun the teacher’s path, that way distraction lies.”

 

 

 

 

 

Perhaps one of her more uplifting writings comes from her address before the alumnae of Synodical Female College, June 4, 1895, entitled “Woman, To-Day and Yesterday”:

“To be a woman is to reign an uncrowned queen, who sees the golden field of opportunity the field where she may do a woman’s part…Our place is what we choose, our sphere, the world. Our limitations, simply to be womanly, for no pent up Utica contacts our powers but the whole boundless universe is ours.”

Woman, To-Day and Yesterday

Woman, To-Day and Yesterday

In a review of her address, the alumnæ association noted that Townsend’s address was delivered before the largest audience ever attended by alumna. Her words surpassed any address before, “her treatment of the woman’s rights question was a source of enthusiasm to her audience and an inspiration.”

Signature

Signature

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing these materials. To view more materials on women’s rights, check out the digital exhibit Women’s Voices Women’s Vote. The DeGolyer continues to expand our digitization efforts, adding new content weekly. We have thousands of items digitized and searchable in our digital collections with many thousands more to come!


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