SMU Humans – Krafting a better world

Daily Campus Originally Posted: May 3, 2019 Melissa Kraft is a member of six honors societies. She is also double-majoring in Psychology and Sociology and minoring in Women’s and Gender Studies and Educational Studies. In April, she won the Outstanding Senior in Sociology Award at the Honors Convocation and the A. Kenneth Pye Award at the Hilltop Excellence Awards. Melissa Kraft with certification for Outstanding Senior in Sociology Award Photo credit: Erica Umphreyville Kraft is no stranger to receiving recognition for her achievements, but to Kraft the most important thing is providing care to those in her community. “In high school, I knew that I wanted to help people but I wasn’t sure at what capacity or what that would look like,” Kraft said. While Kraft may have entered SMU unsure [...]

By | 2019-05-07T06:08:30-07:00 May 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Psychology, Sociology, Sociology (Student)|Comments Off on SMU Humans – Krafting a better world

Project Support Program Makes Its Way to Sweden

Dedman College News Originally Posted: April 23, 2019 Contact: Renee McDonald, rmcdonald@smu.edu SMU psychologists champion critical family intervention program Project Support, an intervention program designed to help improve the parent-child relationship and mental health outcomes for children in families in which intimate partner violence has occurred, is being implemented through social services agencies across Sweden. After a multi-year study, the National Swedish Health Technology Assessment in 2018 designated Project Support, originally developed by SMU Department of Psychology professors Renee McDonald and Ernest Jouriles, as one of two programs with a sufficient evidence base for helping children in domestically violent families (press release: https://www.sbu.se/280). “Project Support has been demonstrated to ameliorate child adjustment problems and improve family functioning,” says Dr. McDonald. “The program has been evaluated in [...]

By | 2019-04-23T06:43:12-07:00 April 23rd, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Project Support Program Makes Its Way to Sweden

Dr. Ernest Jouriles, Psychology Professor, Speaks at National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment

Dedman College News Originally Posted: April 3, 2019 Dr. Ernest Jouriles will be a featured speaker at the National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in Annapolis, Maryland, April 4-5. The two day collaborative forum focuses on America’s colleges, universities, and service academies and is hosted by the Secretary of the Navy, the Secretary of the Army, and the Secretary of the Air Force. One of the primary goals of the event is to "cultivate a network of senior leaders, experts, and dynamic thinkers who will continue to communicate towards the goal of reducing sexual assault and sexual harassment at colleges and universities." Dr. Jouriles will join a group of expert panelists on Thursday morning to discuss prevention strategies. He will address a captive audience of Chancellors, Deans, [...]

By | 2019-04-05T07:49:09-07:00 April 3rd, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Dr. Ernest Jouriles, Psychology Professor, Speaks at National Discussion on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment

No Pleasure in Life—SMU Scientists Test Treatment

Dallas Innovates Originally Posted: Jan. 25, 2019 Can’t find pleasure in any aspect of your life? Researchers studying a treatment If you’ve never heard of anhedonia, it’s the inability to find pleasure in life—any part of it—and it’s a core symptom of major depression and other mental health disorders. Now, researchers from Southern Methodist University and a colleague from UCLA will use a roughly $4 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to study the effectiveness of their treatment in 168 who suffer from this symptom. The study is being conducted by professors Alicia Meuret and Thomas Ritz of SMU and Michelle G. Craske of UCLA. According to SMU, individuals who have depression often say they feel down or blue, have a loss of [...]

By | 2019-01-30T06:47:03-08:00 January 30th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on No Pleasure in Life—SMU Scientists Test Treatment

Advocating for a SAFE Dallas: Courtney Underwood

Dedman College News Originally Posted: Jan 1, 2019 Courtney Underwood, ’05, ’08, became a leader in North Texas in promoting programs to assist survivors of sexual assault. She co-founded the Dallas Rape Crisis Center and since 2013 has been the Executive Director of the SANE Initiative in Dallas. Her latest program, Courtney’s SAFE Place, is North Texas's first community clinic for survivors of sexual violence which opened at Turning Point in Plano on November 13. With this new endeavor and other long-term plans for the future, Underwood continues her tireless efforts to help survivors. What drew you to SMU when you were deciding on a university? How did you come to a decision? Being born and raised in the Park Cities, I grew up around the beauty and prestige of SMU. [...]

By | 2019-01-03T08:45:20-08:00 January 9th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History, Psychology|Comments Off on Advocating for a SAFE Dallas: Courtney Underwood

Alcohol use may increase among Hispanic Americans as they become more ‘Americanized’

SMU Research Originally Posted: December 1, 2018 SMU professor Priscilla Lui and co-author find that ‘Americanization’ of alcohol use affects women more than men Higher rates of alcohol use and drinking consequences are found among Hispanic American adolescents and adults who are more “Americanized,” according to a new study authored by Southern Methodist University (SMU) professor Priscilla Lui and her colleague, Byron Zamboanga, at Smith College. Using scientific research accumulated over the past 40 years, Lui and Zamboanga analyzed data from over 68,000 Hispanic Americans – including first-generation immigrants and native-born individuals. Lui’s research has found that people in this group who are more “Americanized” are more likely to: be drinkers, consume alcohol at greater intensity, experience more negative consequences associated with alcohol use, and [...]

By | 2018-12-11T09:32:45-08:00 December 17th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Alcohol use may increase among Hispanic Americans as they become more ‘Americanized’

NIH Funds Collaborative Study of Cognitive Impairment in Older Asthma Patients

SMU Research  Originally Posted: November 21, 2018 Led by SMU psychologist and UTSW psychiatrist, Dallas Asthma Brain and Cognition Study will use brain scans to explore relationship between inflammatory lung disease and brain function in older adults DALLAS (SMU) – SMU psychologist Thomas Ritz and UT Southwestern Medical Center psychiatrist Sherwood Brown will lead a $2.6 million study funded over four years by the National Institutes of Health to explore the apparent connection between asthma and diminished cognitive function in middle-to-late-age adults. The World Health Organization estimates that 235 million people suffer from asthma worldwide. The study will build on the work Brown and Ritz have accomplished with a core group of researchers over a period of eight years. Their pilot data, gleaned from brain [...]

By | 2018-11-30T07:34:28-08:00 November 30th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on NIH Funds Collaborative Study of Cognitive Impairment in Older Asthma Patients

Alcohol use may increase among Hispanic Americans as they become more ‘Americanized’

Eureka Originally Posted: November 26, 2018 Higher rates of alcohol use and drinking consequences are found among Hispanic American adolescents and adults who are more "Americanized," according to a new study authored by Southern Methodist University (SMU) professor Priscilla Lui and her colleague, Byron Zamboanga, at Smith College. Using scientific research accumulated over the past 40 years, Lui and Zamboanga analyzed data from over 68,000 Hispanic Americans - including first-generation immigrants and native-born individuals. Lui's research has found that people in this group who are more "Americanized" are more likely to: be drinkers, consume alcohol at greater intensity, experience more negative consequences associated with alcohol use, and affect women more than men. Hispanics are the largest ethnic group in the United States. Similar results were [...]

By | 2018-11-27T09:51:25-08:00 November 28th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Alcohol use may increase among Hispanic Americans as they become more ‘Americanized’

Spanking Is Still Really Common and Still Really Bad for Kids

The Atlantic Originally Posted: November 6, 2018 The good news about spanking is that parents today are less likely to do it to their children than parents in the past. The bad news is that parents today still spank their kids—a lot. “Some estimates are that by the time a child reaches the fifth grade [in the United States], 80 percent of children have been spanked,” says George Holden, a professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University who studies parenting and corporal punishment. Spanking is also widespreadworldwide. Perhaps parents are quick to spank their children because it can bring about immediate acquiescence, but the benefits, a consensus of scholars and doctors agree, end there. On Monday, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), which represents 67,000 doctors, came out strongly [...]

By | 2018-11-07T08:35:41-08:00 November 7th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Spanking Is Still Really Common and Still Really Bad for Kids
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