What white parents get wrong about raising antiracist kids — and how to get it right

Washington Post Originally Posted: June 25, 2020 The world feels broken right now — not just cracked in a few places but shattered in a million pieces. It’s been this way for centuries, of course, but many Americans — white Americans — are just starting to wake up and grapple with the depth of this country’s deeply rooted racism, as well as the role they played in making it so. As a white parent, I feel a deep responsibility to provide my children with the tools and awareness to help rebuild our society into something better. I know I’m not alone, but I also know many white parents don’t know how or where to start. Research suggests that we need to confront our unfounded assumptions [...]

By | 2020-06-30T09:46:56-07:00 July 9th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on What white parents get wrong about raising antiracist kids — and how to get it right

When memory and justice fail us

The Hill Originally Post: June 20, 2020 Holly Bowen is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at SMU Dallas where she teaches and directs research on topics including memory, emotion, motivation and aging. Think back to the last time you went on a mission to stock up on supplies due to COVID-19. What route did you take around the store? Can you describe the employee who bagged your groceries? What was the make and model of the car parked next to you? It’s likely this memory is difficult to retrieve and the details surrounding it have faded. After all, this was a stressful and uncertain time and your focus might have been elsewhere. It was some time ago and you have probably forgotten. Now, [...]

By | 2020-06-22T06:15:23-07:00 June 22nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on When memory and justice fail us

How Should Parents Discipline?

Fatherly Originally Posted: February 27, 2020 Psychology professor George Holden was quoted in the blog, Fatherly, about corporal punishment. Research finds it doesn’t work, he says. https://www.fatherly.com/health-science/how-should-parents-discipline-finding-alternatives-to-corporal-punishment/ Professor George W. Holden is the Chair of the Department of Psychology at Southern Methodist University, Texas where he focuses on parent-child relationships, parental cognitions, and discipline. The evidence that corporal punishment (such as spanking, smacking, or slapping) can impair child development is compelling and, at this point, overwhelming. More to the point for parents,  accumulated research convincingly demonstrates that “positive child discipline” — including communicating openly and setting expectations — is much more effective than hitting a child. Still, as parents well know, not every misbehavior provides a teachable moment. Most parents think that punishment is a critical socialization tool [...]

By | 2020-03-05T10:41:30-08:00 February 27th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on How Should Parents Discipline?

Why You Should Swipe Right on an Optimist

Elemental Originally Posted: Feb. 13, 2020 “Involvement in a romantic relationship does not necessarily predict higher well-being,” says study leader Nathan Hudson, PhD, an assistant professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University. “Rather, involvement in poor-quality romantic relationships actually predicts worse well-being than remaining single.” Romantic relationships can up the odds of being happier, living longer, and, according to new research, even help prevent or delay the onset of dementia. That is, of course, if the relationship is good. And increasingly, science shows that one of the keys to a healthy relationship is to pick a happy and optimistic partner. The latest research on the topic, published in the Journal of Personality, involved up to eight years of data on more than 4,000 heterosexual couples, revealing “a potential [...]

By | 2020-02-17T10:05:10-08:00 February 17th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Why You Should Swipe Right on an Optimist

Can Being Happy Really Be a Matter of Being Healthy?

Psychology Today Originally Posted: December 7, 2019 When you think about the features of your life that make you happy, you’re likely to count off such factors as how well your relationships are going, whether you have enough money to pay your bills, how you feel about your work, and whether you’re having a good day so far. How often, in this listing of contributors to your happiness, do you include how healthy you’re feeling? From the opposite perspective, if you’ve got a headache, a cold, or a sore toe, you’re probably not feeling all that happy. However, as soon as you’re better, you forget how much your body’s status affected that of your mind’s. What if your happiness was affected more by your overall [...]

By | 2019-12-09T07:52:15-08:00 December 9th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Can Being Happy Really Be a Matter of Being Healthy?

Is it possible to change your personality? Yes, if you’re willing to do the work involved

Fox 4 Originally Posted: Nov. 5, 2019 DALLAS (SMU) – Want to be more outgoing?  Or less uptight? In an interview with Fox4ward’s Dan Godwin, SMU psychology professor Nathan Hudson said that it is possible for people to change aspects of their personality.  But it will require some work on your part. You can view the video on Hudson’s website. Forbes and Psychology Today also did a piece on the research. Watch the Video  

By | 2019-11-05T09:22:31-08:00 November 5th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Is it possible to change your personality? Yes, if you’re willing to do the work involved

Some Personality Traits Are Easier To Change Than Others

Forbes Originally Posted: September 2019 A growing number of studies in psychology are showing that personality is more “changeable” than previously thought. Personality changes as we age; it changes as we learn new things and are exposed to new environments. But which aspects of personality might be easiest to change, and which might be most difficult? New research appearing in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology may hold the answer. A team of researchers led by Nathan Hudson of Southern Methodist University designed an experiment to test which of five core personality traits would change most over the course of a 15-week intervention. Interestingly, they found that the personality trait of “agreeableness” showed the most improvement while the trait “openness to experiences” showed the least improvement. To arrive [...]

By | 2019-10-21T10:06:33-07:00 October 21st, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Some Personality Traits Are Easier To Change Than Others

The (Lack of) Science Behind Time-Outs As a Tool to Discipline Children

Time Originally Posted: October 15, 2019 George Holden, chair of the Department of Psychology at Southern Methodist University was quoted in this article When Amy and Steve Unruh decided to adopt a four-year-old child from the Philippines, they anticipated challenges. They understood it would take time, as well as a great deal of love and care, for their family and its newest member to adjust. But they were committed to helping a child in need. The Unruh’s were blindsided when their adoption application was turned down. The reason, they were told, was that their parenting style was not suitable for an adopted child. “They said it was because we’ve used time-outs with our daughter,” says Amy Unruh, 43, who is a stay-at-home mom in Milton, [...]

By | 2019-10-15T09:27:35-07:00 October 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on The (Lack of) Science Behind Time-Outs As a Tool to Discipline Children

Mickey’s Wild Ride

SMU News Originally Posted: September 8, 2019 Mickey Dollens ’11 majored in English with a creative writing specialization and minored in psychology. If you look at the arc of Mickey Dollens’ life so far, you can almost feel the syncopated rhythm of the opportunities he embraced and the hard knocks he survived. His story starts with an unlikely football scholarship and his life-changing years at SMU. But just as Mickey’s chapter on the Hilltop was nearing an end, his brother’s suicide drove him to re-examine everything. Mickey tried out for the NFL – and failed. But his attempt managed to earn this Oklahoma flatlander a slot on the U.S. Bobsled team. The life adventure continued after bobsledding with boom (and bust) in the oil business [...]

By | 2019-09-08T19:08:02-07:00 September 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, English, Psychology|Comments Off on Mickey’s Wild Ride
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