Study: Drug offenders more likely to face food insecurity

Medical Xpress Originally Posted: December 10, 2020 People who have a drug-related felony conviction are more likely to face food insecurity than people who have never been arrested. That's what researchers from SMU (Southern Methodist University) and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, found after interviewing more than 1,000 people at North Texas Food Bank food pantries. The finding is significant because food insecurity - defined as a consistent lack of access to enough food for a healthy life - is known to have a variety of consequences for both children and adults. Children who don't get the necessary nutrition from food are much more likely to have health- and education-related issues, such as anemia and impaired cognitive development. Adults, meanwhile, are more prone to develop diabetes, heart disease and other chronic [...]

By | 2020-12-11T13:37:31-08:00 December 10th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Study: Drug offenders more likely to face food insecurity

SMU professor receives NSF grant to model transport of microscale respiratory droplets

December 4, 2020 Contact: Vladimir Ajaev, Principal Investigator, ajaev@smu.edu Vladimir Ajaev, Principal Investigator Dallas, TX - SMU Department of Mathematics professor Vladimir Ajaev has been awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to develop mathematical models describing the spread of diseases through tiny droplets formed in the respiratory airways. The project focus is on the transmission of tuberculosis however its broader societal impacts include potential applications to other infectious diseases such as influenza and COVID-19. “Infectious diseases transmitted by tiny droplets of respiratory fluids affect tens of millions of people worldwide. Better understanding of the mechanism of transmission of infections can lead to improvements in both treatment and protection strategies,” says Vladimir Ajaev, principal investigator. The project will include a multiscale framework that investigates the dynamics of an individual evaporating droplet [...]

By | 2020-12-07T06:40:50-08:00 December 4th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Mathematics|Comments Off on SMU professor receives NSF grant to model transport of microscale respiratory droplets

Wielding the psychology of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance

SMU News Originally Posted: November 17, 2020 DALLAS (SMU) – Understanding the psychology of vaccine acceptance is key to convincing the majority of Americans to take the COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available, says SMU health behavior researcher Austin Baldwin. Pfizer and BioNTech’s Nov. 9 announcement of a promising COVID vaccine candidate, followed by Moderna’s Nov. 16 vaccine announcement, sent stocks soaring and kindled hope across the globe. But a STAT/Harris Poll conducted just days before these announcements found just 58 percent of the American public said they would likely get a COVID vaccine if it lowered their risk by at least half, and those between the ages of 18 and 34 were less likely. Health experts say 70 percent of Americans need to be vaccinated [...]

By | 2020-12-02T08:53:02-08:00 December 2nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Wielding the psychology of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance

Science in the City at SMU this Saturday

Date: Saturday, November 14 Time: 1 p.m. RSVP here It’s virtual and free – learn about our dark universe  Science in the City is a family-friendly public event series that connects the Dallas-Fort Worth community with local researchers working at the frontiers of their fields. SMU partners with the Dallas Morning News and other research and educational institutions every year to share the great science and technology occurring on our campus.  This year’s free, half-hour SMU event is specially designed for middle school and high school students, but adults are welcome, too! FROM A TRAMPOLINE TO THE UNSEEN: WHAT A RUBBER SHEET CAN TEACH US ABOUT THE DARK UNIVERSE Saturday, November 14 at 1 p.m. with SMU - RSVP now. Afraid of physics? You’ll change your [...]

By | 2020-11-09T18:25:09-08:00 November 9th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on Science in the City at SMU this Saturday

Meet the Editors: A Conversation with Andy Graybill and Ben Johnson on the David J. Weber Series in New Borderlands History

UNC Press Blog Originally Posted: October 15, 2020 We’re pleased to share a Q&A with Andrew R. Graybill and Benjamin H. Johnson, series editors of our David J. Weber Series in the New Borderlands History. This series explores contested boundaries and the intercultural dynamics surrounding them and includes projects in a wide range of time and space within North America and beyond, including Atlantic and Pacific worlds. Series editors welcome outstanding works that “speak back” to the rich literature that has developed over the last few decades, using the concept of borderlands to examine, analyze, and interpret both the North American borderlands and other areas connected to continental processes of making and crossing borders. We are also pleased to announce two new members of the [...]

By | 2020-10-15T08:56:51-07:00 October 15th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History, SW Center|Comments Off on Meet the Editors: A Conversation with Andy Graybill and Ben Johnson on the David J. Weber Series in New Borderlands History

The Outsized Role of the President in Race Relations

Smithsonian Originally Posted: October 8, 2020 resident Barack Obama’s love of the Martin Luther King quote “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice,” went so deep that he had it woven into a rug in the Oval Office. For Obama, writes author Mychal Denzsel Smith, the quote was used “to temper the hope his presidency inspired, to remind those who had placed their faith in his message of change that it would not be one singular moment… that would usher in a new and just society.” Since the founding of the nation, the United States has had its share of moments that bent the arc in a more just direction, particularly on matters of race, such as the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation [...]

By | 2020-10-15T08:58:22-07:00 October 12th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on The Outsized Role of the President in Race Relations

Parents Should Not Be Spanking Their Kids, and Here’s Why

Parents Magazine Originally Posted: September 2020 While most parents spank their children at some point, experts advise against the disciplinary practice. Learn more about the negative psychological, behavioral, and emotional effects of spanking, and figure out better alternatives for discipline. Few topics spark more debate among parents than spanking. But even though a majority of parents have used physical punishment on their children at some point, according to the including the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), many experts and organizations, have spoken out against it. “Parents who occasionally spank aren't bad people,” explains George W. Holden, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at Southern Methodist University and author of Parenting: A Dynamic Perspective, 2nd ed, who has studied the topic for about 25 [...]

By | 2020-09-30T07:12:28-07:00 September 30th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Parents Should Not Be Spanking Their Kids, and Here’s Why

The Key to Happiness: Family or Friends?

SMU News Originally Posted: September 24, 2020 DALLAS (SMU) – Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness? You may actually be happier getting together with your friends, said SMU psychology professor Nathan Hudson. Hudson’s research finds that people report higher levels of well-being while hanging with their friends than they do with their romantic partner or children. In fact, being around romantic partners predicted the least amount of happiness among these three groups, reveals a study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.    Hudson stressed, however, that the finding has more to do with the activity than the person it is shared with. That’s because people tend to spend more of their time doing enjoyable activities with friends [...]

By | 2020-09-24T19:33:13-07:00 September 24th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on The Key to Happiness: Family or Friends?

Opinion: Convictions based on the pseudoscience of hypnosis allow for the miscarriage of justice

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: September 19, 2020 Holly Bowen, assistant psychology professor at SMU Dallas who specializes in memory issues, for a piece challenging the legitimacy of testimony from interviews conducted while the subject is under hypnosis. Since the inception of criminal investigations, the techniques and procedures used in these inquests have been plagued by pseudoscientific claims. From spectral evidence allowed at the Salem witch trials and phrenologists interpreting bumps on the skulls of criminals, to modern-day polygraphs to detect lying and hypnosis to unlock repressed or forgotten memories, the justice system, and ultimately people’s lives, have too often been dictated by “junk” science. While spectral evidence, phrenology and polygraphs are no longer admissible in court cases, hypnosis continues to be used by law [...]

By | 2020-09-21T19:17:21-07:00 September 22nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Opinion: Convictions based on the pseudoscience of hypnosis allow for the miscarriage of justice

Wildfire Archaeology and the Burning American West

Sapiens Originally Posted: September 9, 2020 As I type, the American West is ablaze with more than 100 devastating wildfires. Many of these are record-setting in both size and intensity. Several, including one in my home state of Colorado, have been so intense they’ve created their own thunderstorms. Science shows that wildfires have been getting more destructive over the last several decades. The question is: Why? Are they getting worse due to climate change? Or is it due to human encroachment on once remote forests? Or, counterintuitive as it may seem, are federal wildfire suppression policies to blame? In the U.S., forest fire management policies date back to the 1880s, shortly after Yellowstone National Park was established in 1872. After a roughly 50-year period in which some [...]

By | 2020-09-10T10:26:14-07:00 September 10th, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Wildfire Archaeology and the Burning American West
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