What happened to the fossil on display at DFW Airport? Curious Texas digs up the answer

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Nov. 27, 2019 When DFW International Airport was being built in the 1970s, construction crews found the bones of a 70 million-year-old sea monster. Well, it wasn’t a monster exactly, but a 25-foot long plesiosaur, a large dinosaur with a body similar to a lizard’s but with flippers like those on a porpoise. It was one of many that roamed North Texas when water covered the land millions of years ago. The nearly 10,000-pound fossil was put on display between Gates 10 and 11 at the Braniff International terminal at DFW Airport in 1975, and it remained there even after Braniff Airways ceased operations in May 1982. The artifact later was moved again, and in the mid-2010s, the plesiosaur was [...]

By | 2019-11-27T09:28:56-08:00 November 30th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on What happened to the fossil on display at DFW Airport? Curious Texas digs up the answer

A Paleontologist, A Former Writer And Some Nerds Walk Into A Bar. This Is Profs And Pints.

KERA Originally Posted: Nov. 12, 2019 It’s 6:30 on a Tuesday night. Local brews, some cocktails, wine and food are filling tables at the Cambria hotel that looks out on Dallas’ still busy Elm Street. It’s lecture time. A budding business mixing spirits and scholars has come to Dallas. Profs and Pints is taking the traditional college class out of the lecture hall and into a bar. “Hello everybody, welcome to profs and pints… Thank you for coming out tonight,” says Peter Schmidt, who created Profs and Pints. His crowd of self-described geeks and nerds are especially into tonight’s topic – mosasaurs – giant sea creatures that swam around North Texas 72 million years ago. “Mosasaurs are actually one of my favorite dinosaurs,” said Shea Legters. That’s why [...]

By | 2019-11-13T10:24:09-08:00 November 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on A Paleontologist, A Former Writer And Some Nerds Walk Into A Bar. This Is Profs And Pints.

Explore the hidden wonders, technology happening right here in Dallas with Science in the City

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: March 8, 2019 This is an excerpt from a Dallas Morning News article. Read the full article here.  Register for Science in the City here. How to listen for earthquakes, feel the vibrations (and sturdiness) of bridges, and even make better bionic legs Did you know you can “listen” for earthquakes? No, it’s more than putting your ear to the ground to see if one is coming. Seismologists study seismic waves to see how strong an earthquake is and pinpoint its epicenter. They can examine these waves to detect a number of things, including nuclear explosions. At SMU’s Science in the City, you can learn how seismologists from SMU do just that. You’ll also get a chance to learn how the school’s engineers [...]

By | 2019-03-08T09:53:27-08:00 March 8th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences|Comments Off on Explore the hidden wonders, technology happening right here in Dallas with Science in the City

In Memoriam: Richard Haberman

Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), Dynamical Systems Acivity Group electronic magazine Originally Posted: Feb. 7, 2019 Richard Haberman, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1978-2015 We are very sad to have to report that Richard Haberman passed away on December 31, 2018. Richard (Rich) was born in Brooklyn, NY, in 1945, and grew up on Long Island. He received his BS (1967) and PhD (1971) at MIT. After a postdoc at UC San Diego and stints at Rutgers and The Ohio State, Rich spent the bulk of his career at Southern Methodist University (SMU). During his time as a graduate student, he met Mark Ablowitz, both of whom had the same advisor David Benney. Rich and Mark established a strong friendship that lasted [...]

By | 2019-02-07T18:48:08-08:00 February 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Mathematics|Comments Off on In Memoriam: Richard Haberman

Government shutdown freezes Dallas scientists’ work — and paychecks

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: January 16, 2019 The 25-foot-long swimming lizards sit alone in the dark. A few weeks ago, they drew thousands of visitors a day at the Washington, D.C., National Museum of Natural History, where they helped tell the story of shifting continents, evolution and life on Earth. Now the museum is closed, a casualty of the partial government shutdown. "It just makes no sense," said Louis Jacobs, a paleontologist at Southern Methodist University who spent months assembling the exhibit with a team of colleagues and students. The show was a career highlight for Jacobs, who retired from SMU last May, and a source of pride for his team and the school.  It showcases 85-million-year-old fossils that Jacobs and colleagues unearthed along the coastal cliffs of West Africa starting [...]

By | 2019-01-17T09:41:36-08:00 January 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Government shutdown freezes Dallas scientists’ work — and paychecks

Fossils From Angola Bring Strange Yet Familiar Ocean into View

VOA Originally Posted: November 26, 2018   Some may be familiar with mythical sea monsters. For example, Scotland’s infamous Loch Ness Monster “Nessie,” and Giganto -- fictional beasts of comic book fame. But millions of years ago, real-life sea monsters lived and thrived in what we now call the South Atlantic Ocean. South Atlantic Ocean basin As the continents of South America and Africa separated millions of years ago, scientists say a fantastic array of ferocious predators and other lifeforms colonized the newly formed body of water off the coast of Angola. That diverse collection of marine reptiles included mosasaurs (aquatic lizards), plesiosaurs (which exhibited broad flat bodies, large paddlelike limbs, and typically a long flexible neck and small head), and the more familiar giant [...]

By | 2018-11-27T10:03:37-08:00 November 29th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Events, Faculty News, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Fossils From Angola Bring Strange Yet Familiar Ocean into View

How an SMU dinosaur hunter’s 72-million-year-old sea monster got to the Smithsonian

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: November 14, 2018 Three weeks before his team's fossil finds go on display at one of the world's most famous natural history museums, Louis Jacobs stands in a basement lab at Southern Methodist University sanding the lower jaw of a 72-million-year-old sea monster. His colleague Michael Polcyn sits nearby, dabbing sealant on a model of the animal's upper jaw and skull. White dust hovers in the air. Plaster tailbones, skulls and teeth top every counter. This is the sort of work — preparing models and fossils — that Jacobs had done early in his career, before he became a professor, before he hunted for fossils in Alaska, Antarctica, Malawi, Cameroon and Texas; before he dug up the bones of dinosaurs [...]

By | 2018-11-14T18:23:37-08:00 November 15th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on How an SMU dinosaur hunter’s 72-million-year-old sea monster got to the Smithsonian

Listen: Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola

NPR Originally Posted: November 8, 2018 When the South Atlantic Ocean was young, sea monsters ruled it. Some of their bones have turned up along the coast of West Africa and are going on exhibit Friday at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. They tell a story of the bloody birth of an ocean. The fossils of giant swimming reptiles called mosasaurs have been found in the rocky cliffs of Angola, overlooking the Atlantic. It's not a country known for fossils. Few scientists have looked there — half a century of civil war made it too dangerous. But geologically, Angola is special. About 200 million years ago, Africa was part of the supercontinent Gondwana. Then, about 135 million years ago, that continent started unzipping down [...]

By | 2018-11-08T06:51:27-08:00 November 8th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Listen: Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola

12 things to do in the D.C. area this week

Washington Post Originally Posted: November 5, 2018 New exhibit, with SMU ties, opens at the National Museum of Natural History this week in Washington, D.C. Excerpt below. ‘Sea Monsters Unearthed’ at National Museum of Natural History: Go back in time millions of years to the era of mosasaurs, also known as giant marine lizards (or, yes, sea monsters). The National Museum of Natural History’s new Sant Ocean Hall exhibit, called “Sea Monsters Unearthed: Life in Angola’s Ancient Seas,” reveals fossils of colossal Cretaceous marine reptiles on public display for the first time. The waters along Africa’s southwest coast once teemed with the ferocious predators and other sea life, and the museum is showing off animations, murals and full-scale reconstructions of these creatures from the ancient [...]

By | 2018-11-05T10:04:07-08:00 November 5th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Events, Faculty News, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on 12 things to do in the D.C. area this week
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