Do Those Blue Light Filters on Devices Really Help You Sleep?

KQED Science Originally Posted: November 27, 2017 If you’re losing sleep over the blue light coming from your phone, there’s an app for that. In fact, there are now lots of apps that promise to improve sleep by filtering out the blue light produced by phones, tablets, computers and even televisions. But how well do these apps work? There haven’t been any big studies to answer that question. So I phoned a couple of scientists who study the link between blue light exposure and sleep. My first call is to Lisa Ostrin, an assistant professor at the University of Houston College of Optometry. Ostrin owns an iPhone. And every iPhone comes with an app called Night Shift that lets you filter out blue light. So [...]

By | 2017-11-29T07:24:54+00:00 November 29th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Do Those Blue Light Filters on Devices Really Help You Sleep?

How Would a Tax Code Overhaul Impact North Texas Charities?

NBC 5 Originally Posted: November 27, 2017 After Cyber Monday comes Giving Tuesday, part of a national call to encourage people to give to their favorite charities during the Christmas season. At the same time, Congress is back to work trying to overhaul the U.S. Tax Code before the end of the year, and some wonder if the current plan could cost charities. Under a plan presented by House Republicans, charitable giving is still tax deductible, but fewer people may end up using the deduction. In an effort to simplify the tax code, the standard deduction would nearly double so that fewer people would need to itemize deductions and would instead just take a standard deduction. But if there is less of a need to [...]

By | 2017-11-29T07:22:16+00:00 November 29th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on How Would a Tax Code Overhaul Impact North Texas Charities?

Hidden History – A Room With the View at SMU

Surfing Report Originally Posted: November 26, 2017 Dallas, Texas — At my Alma Mater, Southern Methodist University (SMU), there is a Room with, hands down, the best view of the campus and of the Dallas skyline. And, it’s a 100-year-old Secret to most Mustangs. Welcome to the Attic Apartment atop Dallas Hall. Dallas Hall sits atop an actual Hilltop at SMU and commands a view of the entire campus (voted one of the most beautiful in the nation) as well as the skyline of the city of Dallas. The building is listed on the national historical register, and its dome is quite majestic. If you look at Dallas Hall, focus on the two stone balconies beneath the grand Dome, on each side. Now look at [...]

By | 2017-11-28T08:11:30+00:00 November 28th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on Hidden History – A Room With the View at SMU

Dedman College Student Has Heart for Kids Battling Heart Defects

NBC 5 Originally Posted: November 25, 2017 Jeffrey Kelley is a healthy SMU English and sociology major. He plays symbols in the SMU Mustang band. But, he was born with a congenital heart defect and had his first surgery at six weeks old. He was homeschooled and had limited physical activity until he had another surgery at age 16. Jeffrey’s dad sent three e-mails to friends suggesting they send cards to his son after his surgery. To Jeffrey’s surprise, and embarrassment, he received more than 1,000 cards. Jeffrey is a person who would much rather be the card-sender than the card-receiver, so he turned this avalanche of support into a foundation to help other kids with congenital heart defects, Jeffrey has Heart.  In just two [...]

By | 2017-11-27T11:45:18+00:00 November 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, English, Sociology, Sociology (Student), Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Dedman College Student Has Heart for Kids Battling Heart Defects

Watch: Abraham Zapruder and JFK Assassination Alexandra Zapruder talked about her book, Twenty-Six Seconds: A Personal History of the Zapruder Film

C-Span Originally Posted: October 26, 2017 Abraham Zapruder and JFK Assassination Alexandra Zapruder talked about her book, Twenty-Six Seconds: A Personal History of the Zapruder Film. Abraham Zapruder filmed President Kennedy’s Dallas motorcade and assassination in 1963 with his home movie camera. Alexandra Zapruder is his granddaughter. Watch    

By | 2017-11-27T08:03:44+00:00 November 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events|Comments Off on Watch: Abraham Zapruder and JFK Assassination Alexandra Zapruder talked about her book, Twenty-Six Seconds: A Personal History of the Zapruder Film

SMU Physics Ph.D. Pens Op-ED in Dallas Morning News

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: November 23, 2017 This month, the House voted in favor of HR 1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. In an attempt to simplify the tax code, many deductions were eliminated in favor of a higher standard deduction for all Americans. One such repeal was Section 117(d)(5). Why is this so impactful, and why has its repeal caused such an uproar from those in higher education? To understand this question, you must first understand the complicated ways that universities compensate their graduate students. I'm a Ph.D. student at SMU studying particle physics, and at SMU and other major research institutions in the United States, students from all over the globe compete for a handful of positions in one of our [...]

By | 2017-11-27T07:54:19+00:00 November 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Graduate News, Physics|Comments Off on SMU Physics Ph.D. Pens Op-ED in Dallas Morning News

Dedman College Alumna Whitney Wolfe Helped Women Score Dates. Now She Wants to Get Them Their Dream Job

Elle Originally Posted: November 27, 2017 Whitney Wolfe is perched on a chaise longue in a suite at Austin’s South Congress Hotel, a sleek, boutique-y outfit that epitomizes the city’s hipster renaissance, straining to remember the slang used in China to refer to single women over 30. “A girl in China just told us about it, and I found it fascinating,” she says. “It’s like ‘left on a shelf’ or something,” offers Wolfe’s coworker Louise, a stylish twentysomething with a British accent and a glittery ear cuff. “Leftovers?” Wolfe asks. No, no, that’s not it. Finally: “Expired? Expired!” This is the type of anecdote Wolfe lives for. In late 2014, she founded Bumble, known as the “feminist dating app” for its requirement that women message [...]

By | 2017-11-29T07:30:54+00:00 November 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on Dedman College Alumna Whitney Wolfe Helped Women Score Dates. Now She Wants to Get Them Their Dream Job

Hurricane Harvey: Can Trump nudge Texas to dip into its rainy day fund?

E & E News Originally Posted: November 22, 2017 The Trump administration is trying to get Gov. Greg Abbott and the rest of Texas' GOP leadership to do something they've tried to avoid: tap into a $10 billion stockpile known as the rainy day fund. "We feel strongly that they should step up and play a role and work with the federal government in this process," White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said last week. Sanders was defending a $44 billion aid proposal aimed at helping Texas and other areas in the aftermath of 2017 disasters (E&E Daily, Nov. 17). That's less than the $61 billion Texas alone requested for recovery and mitigation in light of Hurricane Harvey, which struck in late August and caused [...]

By | 2017-11-27T07:58:48+00:00 November 25th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Hurricane Harvey: Can Trump nudge Texas to dip into its rainy day fund?

Oil and gas industry is causing Texas earthquakes, a ‘landmark’ study suggests

Washington Post Originally Posted: November 24, 2017 An unnatural number of earthquakes hit Texas in the past decade, and the region's seismic activity is increasing. In 2008, two earthquakes stronger than magnitude 3 struck the state. Eight years later, 12 did. Natural forces trigger most earthquakes. But humans are causing earthquakes, too, with mining and dam construction the most frequent suspects. There has been a recent increase in natural gas extraction — including fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, but other techniques as well — which produces a lot of wastewater. To get rid of it, the water is injected deep into the ground. When wastewater works its way into dormant faults, the thinking goes, the water's pressure nudges the ancient cracks. Pent-up tectonic stress releases and the ground shakes. But for any [...]

By | 2017-11-29T07:27:21+00:00 November 25th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Oil and gas industry is causing Texas earthquakes, a ‘landmark’ study suggests

Happy Thanksgiving from Dedman College

Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving! SMU is closed November 23 and 24.  

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