SMU psychology professor recognized as APS Rising Star

Dedman College News Originally Posted: January 24, 2019   Congratulations to Priscilla Lui! According to the Association of Psychological Science (APS) website, the APS Rising Star designation is presented to outstanding APS members in the earliest stages of their research career post-PhD. Drawing its name from an Observer editorial series that featured exemplars of the exciting work being done by the field’s newest researchers, this designation recognizes researchers whose innovative work has already advanced the field and signals great potential for their continued contributions. Lui received her Rising Star designation for her promise of excellence in research based on the following criteria: significant publications significant recognitions significant discoveries, methodological innovations, or theoretical or empirical contributions work with potentially broad impact  

By | 2019-01-24T08:46:23-07:00 January 24th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on SMU psychology professor recognized as APS Rising Star

Advocating for a SAFE Dallas: Courtney Underwood

Dedman College News Originally Posted: Jan 1, 2019 Courtney Underwood, ’05, ’08, became a leader in North Texas in promoting programs to assist survivors of sexual assault. She co-founded the Dallas Rape Crisis Center and since 2013 has been the Executive Director of the SANE Initiative in Dallas. Her latest program, Courtney’s SAFE Place, is North Texas's first community clinic for survivors of sexual violence which opened at Turning Point in Plano on November 13. With this new endeavor and other long-term plans for the future, Underwood continues her tireless efforts to help survivors. What drew you to SMU when you were deciding on a university? How did you come to a decision? Being born and raised in the Park Cities, I grew up around the beauty and prestige of SMU. [...]

By | 2019-01-03T08:45:20-07:00 January 9th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History, Psychology|Comments Off on Advocating for a SAFE Dallas: Courtney Underwood

Alcohol use may increase among Hispanic Americans as they become more ‘Americanized’

SMU Research Originally Posted: December 1, 2018 SMU professor Priscilla Lui and co-author find that ‘Americanization’ of alcohol use affects women more than men Higher rates of alcohol use and drinking consequences are found among Hispanic American adolescents and adults who are more “Americanized,” according to a new study authored by Southern Methodist University (SMU) professor Priscilla Lui and her colleague, Byron Zamboanga, at Smith College. Using scientific research accumulated over the past 40 years, Lui and Zamboanga analyzed data from over 68,000 Hispanic Americans – including first-generation immigrants and native-born individuals. Lui’s research has found that people in this group who are more “Americanized” are more likely to: be drinkers, consume alcohol at greater intensity, experience more negative consequences associated with alcohol use, and [...]

By | 2018-12-11T09:32:45-07:00 December 17th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Alcohol use may increase among Hispanic Americans as they become more ‘Americanized’

NIH Funds Collaborative Study of Cognitive Impairment in Older Asthma Patients

SMU Research  Originally Posted: November 21, 2018 Led by SMU psychologist and UTSW psychiatrist, Dallas Asthma Brain and Cognition Study will use brain scans to explore relationship between inflammatory lung disease and brain function in older adults DALLAS (SMU) – SMU psychologist Thomas Ritz and UT Southwestern Medical Center psychiatrist Sherwood Brown will lead a $2.6 million study funded over four years by the National Institutes of Health to explore the apparent connection between asthma and diminished cognitive function in middle-to-late-age adults. The World Health Organization estimates that 235 million people suffer from asthma worldwide. The study will build on the work Brown and Ritz have accomplished with a core group of researchers over a period of eight years. Their pilot data, gleaned from brain [...]

By | 2018-11-30T07:34:28-07:00 November 30th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on NIH Funds Collaborative Study of Cognitive Impairment in Older Asthma Patients

Alcohol use may increase among Hispanic Americans as they become more ‘Americanized’

Eureka Originally Posted: November 26, 2018 Higher rates of alcohol use and drinking consequences are found among Hispanic American adolescents and adults who are more "Americanized," according to a new study authored by Southern Methodist University (SMU) professor Priscilla Lui and her colleague, Byron Zamboanga, at Smith College. Using scientific research accumulated over the past 40 years, Lui and Zamboanga analyzed data from over 68,000 Hispanic Americans - including first-generation immigrants and native-born individuals. Lui's research has found that people in this group who are more "Americanized" are more likely to: be drinkers, consume alcohol at greater intensity, experience more negative consequences associated with alcohol use, and affect women more than men. Hispanics are the largest ethnic group in the United States. Similar results were [...]

By | 2018-11-27T09:51:25-07:00 November 28th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Alcohol use may increase among Hispanic Americans as they become more ‘Americanized’

Spanking Is Still Really Common and Still Really Bad for Kids

The Atlantic Originally Posted: November 6, 2018 The good news about spanking is that parents today are less likely to do it to their children than parents in the past. The bad news is that parents today still spank their kids—a lot. “Some estimates are that by the time a child reaches the fifth grade [in the United States], 80 percent of children have been spanked,” says George Holden, a professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University who studies parenting and corporal punishment. Spanking is also widespreadworldwide. Perhaps parents are quick to spank their children because it can bring about immediate acquiescence, but the benefits, a consensus of scholars and doctors agree, end there. On Monday, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), which represents 67,000 doctors, came out strongly [...]

By | 2018-11-07T08:35:41-07:00 November 7th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Spanking Is Still Really Common and Still Really Bad for Kids

Event: October 20, SMU Mindfulness Talk

Event Date: October 20, 2018 Time: 2-2:30pm Location: Owens Arts Center B600 SMU Film & Media Arts Dept. and the SMU Psychology Clinic invites you to join authors Phakchok Rinpoche and Erric Solomon for a conversation on their upcoming book Radically Happy. Phakchok Rinpoche is a premier example of a new generation of Tibetan Buddhist masters. He combines the most profound aspects of traditional wisdom teaching with his pithy, humorous observation of their ongoing relevance to the incredible fast pace of modern urban life. Erric Solomon, throughout his career as a Silicon Valley technology entrepreneur and now as an author and innovative meditation teacher, has been interested in understanding the mind and how it functions, both as a user-experience designer and as a mind hacker. Together [...]

By | 2018-10-10T07:44:25-07:00 October 10th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Events, Psychology|Comments Off on Event: October 20, SMU Mindfulness Talk

A new survey reveals that not only do business executives value college, they want students with skills associated with the liberal arts.

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: August 28, 2018 Public May Not Trust Higher Ed, but Employers Do  A new survey reveals that not only do business executives value college, they want students with skills associated with the liberal arts. Though public support for higher education seems to be waning, this skepticism doesn’t appear to extend to potential employers, who say they still have faith in colleges and universities, according to a new survey conducted on behalf of the Association of American Colleges & Universities. But while executives and hiring managers believe that institutions are teaching graduates the skills needed for entry-level jobs, they reported that students usually aren’t ready to be promoted. AAC&U commissioned the Washington, D.C.-based Hart Research Associates to survey two groups: 500 or so business [...]

By | 2018-08-28T10:01:16-07:00 August 28th, 2018|Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, Economics, English, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, Statistical Science, Undergraduate News, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on A new survey reveals that not only do business executives value college, they want students with skills associated with the liberal arts.

New Research from the SMU Department of Psychology: Intimate Partner Violence, Police Involvement, and Women’s Trauma Symptoms

SMU Research Originally Posted: June 22, 2018 Police involvement after domestic violence reports associated with more trauma symptoms for women. Research just published from SMU Psychology graduate student Caitlin Rancher with professors Ernie Jouriles and Renee McDonald. READ MORE

By | 2018-06-25T08:46:55-07:00 July 9th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, Psychology|Comments Off on New Research from the SMU Department of Psychology: Intimate Partner Violence, Police Involvement, and Women’s Trauma Symptoms
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