Dark Matter is a huge mystery. This device is trying to detect it.

National Geographic Originally Posted: October 8, 2018 Jodi Cooley, a physicist at Southern Methodist University and a principal investigator at the SuperCDMS dark matter detector was quoted in this article. In an otherwise unassuming facility in northern Seattle, a supercooled tangle of tubes and wires is poised to remake the world. Coursing with liquid helium, the device's interior hovers less than a tenth of a degree above absolute zero, the coldest possible temperature. Inside the frigid cavity, carefully shielded from noise, microwave radiation can resonate like sound waves in a bell, hunting for hints of particles whizzing through that, in all other contexts, would be invisible. Meet the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment, or ADMX: the most sensitive scientific instrument of its kind ever built. If ADMX confirms the existence of [...]

By | 2018-10-08T14:04:44+00:00 October 8th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on Dark Matter is a huge mystery. This device is trying to detect it.

LHC CERN Announcement: Why Higgs Boson Decay Observation Matters

Newsweek Originally Posted: August 30, 2018 Higgs boson, the once-theoretical particle that backs up our best scientific model of the universe, has been observed decaying for the first time—and this is excellent news as it means everything we understand about our physical world still holds true. The discovery of Higgs boson in 2013 provided support for the Standard Model of particle physics. It describes three of the four fundamental forces in the universe—the strong force, the weak force, the electromagnetic force and the gravitational force—and explains how matter interacts. While incomplete, it is our best understanding of how the universe works. By observing the Higgs boson decaying, scientists have more evidence in support of the Standard Model. Scientists working at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider made [...]

By | 2018-09-06T07:57:28+00:00 September 6th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on LHC CERN Announcement: Why Higgs Boson Decay Observation Matters

SMU Physicist Explains Significance of Latest Cern Discovery Related to the Higgs Boson

SMU Research Originally Posted: August 28, 2018 Stephen Sekula says observation of the Higgs particle transforming into bottom quarks confirms the 20th-century recipe for mass Scientists conducting physics experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider have announced the discovery of the Higgs boson transforming, as it decays, into subatomic particles called bottom quarks, an observation that confirms that the “Standard Model” of the universe – the 20th century recipe for everything in the known physical world – is still valid. This new discovery is a big step forward in the quest to understand how the Higgs enables fundamental particles to acquire mass. Many scientists suspect that the Higgs could interact with particles outside the Standard Model, such as dark matter – the unseen matter that does [...]

By | 2018-08-29T06:21:41+00:00 August 29th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on SMU Physicist Explains Significance of Latest Cern Discovery Related to the Higgs Boson

A new survey reveals that not only do business executives value college, they want students with skills associated with the liberal arts.

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: August 28, 2018 Public May Not Trust Higher Ed, but Employers Do  A new survey reveals that not only do business executives value college, they want students with skills associated with the liberal arts. Though public support for higher education seems to be waning, this skepticism doesn’t appear to extend to potential employers, who say they still have faith in colleges and universities, according to a new survey conducted on behalf of the Association of American Colleges & Universities. But while executives and hiring managers believe that institutions are teaching graduates the skills needed for entry-level jobs, they reported that students usually aren’t ready to be promoted. AAC&U commissioned the Washington, D.C.-based Hart Research Associates to survey two groups: 500 or so business [...]

By | 2018-08-28T10:01:16+00:00 August 28th, 2018|Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, Economics, English, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, Statistical Science, Undergraduate News, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on A new survey reveals that not only do business executives value college, they want students with skills associated with the liberal arts.

SMU Physicists Part of First Team to Observe Higgs Boson, Bottom Quarks Interaction

Dedman College News Originally Posted: July 13, 2018 In a breakthrough development in the field of physics, Associate Professor Stephen Sekula and his group of researchers in the SMU Department of Physics are part of the ATLAS Experiment team to first observe the direct interaction between the Higgs boson and the bottom quark. After several years of dedicated research, the ATLAS Experiment is the first to announce their success and definitively prove the interaction between the particles, ahead of other research groups who were focused on the task. From left to right: Maddie McKay, Matthew Feickert, Peilong Wang, and (seated) Jeff Hetherly. The Higgs boson is a special particle that plays an essential role in the Standard Model of particle physics, the theory [...]

By | 2018-07-13T13:31:59+00:00 July 13th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News, Physics|Comments Off on SMU Physicists Part of First Team to Observe Higgs Boson, Bottom Quarks Interaction

Diversifying the Dark Matter Portfolio

American Physical Society Originally Posted: July 25, 2018 In 2012, CERN coaxed the long-sought Higgs boson into making an appearance, and in 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory directly observed an elusive space-time wiggle. Both phenomena were theorized about for decades before their eventual discovery. So perhaps it is high time for dark matter, the mysterious stuff that makes up around 27 percent of the universe, to finally reveal itself. But directly detecting particles that don’t reflect, absorb, or emit light is no easy task, especially without knowing what kind of particles they are — or how they interact with regular matter. One of the prevailing hypotheses for many years has been that dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which are possibly [...]

By | 2018-07-25T08:46:58+00:00 July 5th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on Diversifying the Dark Matter Portfolio

Listen: Physics Professor, Jodi Cooley Talks About Dark Matter on Science Friday

Science Friday Originally Posted: June 9, 2018 Planets, stars, and physical “stuff” make up a tiny fraction of the universe. Most of the universe’s mass is instead invisible dark matter, which makes itself known not by luminance, but by its gravitational influence on the cosmos. The motions of galaxies and stars require dark matter to be explained. Yet despite decades of searching and millions of dollars spent, physicists still haven’t been able to track down a dark matter particle. In this segment, physicists Jodi Cooley and Flip Tanedo, and Gizmodo science writer Ryan Mandelbaum talk about how experimentalists and theorists are getting creative in the hunt for dark matter—and why a few physicists say it’s time to abandon the chase and rewrite the rules of [...]

By | 2018-06-11T07:52:37+00:00 June 11th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on Listen: Physics Professor, Jodi Cooley Talks About Dark Matter on Science Friday

The Most Interesting Player On The PGA Tour Isn’t Tiger Woods; It’s Bryson DeChambeau

Forbes Originally Posted: June 4, 2018 Hardly anyone beyond regular PGA Tour viewers would know the name Bryson DeChambeau in spite of his stellar résumé. Since turning pro in 2016, he has won two events, including Jack Nicklaus' Memorial Tournament this past weekend against a very strong field.  Before that, he became only the 5th player to win both both the NCAA Championship and the U.S. Amateur. What makes him one of the most interesting players to come along on the PGA Tour is that he has chucked a homogenized element of golf — the use of different length clubs (for irons) — in favor of using a single-length shaft for all of his irons (here are details on his clubs). While it may seem like minor thing, playing with one-length irons [...]

By | 2018-06-07T10:21:54+00:00 June 7th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Physics|Comments Off on The Most Interesting Player On The PGA Tour Isn’t Tiger Woods; It’s Bryson DeChambeau

SMU alum wins Memorial on second playoff hole

Columbus Dispatch Originally Posted: June 2, 2018 Bryson DeChambeau majored in physics at Southern Methodist University. He went on to win the Memorial with a birdie on the second playoff hole Sunday, June 3. Bryson DeChambeau is no Einstein, but he would like to meet the man. And who knows, given the uncertainties of time-space travel the encounter could happen. Until then, DeChambeau must be content to discuss matters of physics with members of the golf media whose eyes glaze over when the 24-year-old starts in on the mechanics of swing theory (as opposed to string theory, which also interests him). “I’m not going to give too much away,” he said of nagging questions concerning his swing concepts. “But it’s got to do with anatomical [...]

By | 2018-06-04T10:34:18+00:00 June 4th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Physics|Comments Off on SMU alum wins Memorial on second playoff hole

Discovering the stars, changing her future: Jasmine Liu ’18

SMU News Originally Posted: May 30, 2018 Invisible to the naked eye, the variable star ROTSE1 J000831.43+223154.8 flickers in the northern sky. It hides within an ancient star map formed, it was said, when the king of the gods transformed his most heroic steed into a constellation. For Jasmine Liu ’18 – an SMU physics student and Hamilton Undergraduate Research Scholar – it represents a crowning achievement in her University career. As a student living in Dallas, it was fitting that her work helped unveil a variable star in the Pegasus constellation. The city of Dallas long ago adopted the winged horse of Greek song and story as its own – not as a myth but as a symbol of striving, of inspiration, of looking [...]

By | 2018-05-31T09:04:13+00:00 May 31st, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Physics, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Discovering the stars, changing her future: Jasmine Liu ’18
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