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SMU Study Finds Drug to Prevent Spread of HIV Cousin

D Healthcare Daily Originally Posted: December 9, 2019 Research from SMU may have found a way to prevent the spread of HTLV-1, a cousin of HIV that infects 10-15 million people. The virus causes cells to divide uncontrollably, which can lead to leukemia, neurological disease, and an inflammatory disease of the nervous system whose symptoms include affecting one’s ability to walk, coma, and even death. The drug is called Oleandrin and is derived from the Nerium oleander plant. It targets a stage in the reproduction process of the virus that has yet to be attempted by other treatment. There is no known treatment for the virus, which attacks white blood cells and is spread in a similar manner to HIV, through bodily fluid and breastmilk. “Our [...]

By | 2019-12-17T07:47:24-08:00 December 17th, 2019|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU Study Finds Drug to Prevent Spread of HIV Cousin

How do I decide what to major in if I don’t even know what I want my career to be yet?

SMU News Being the first to go to college can be hard. SMU senior, Kaityln, shares her TOP TEN TIPS to help you through the experience. Watch

By | 2019-12-16T11:17:11-08:00 December 16th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on How do I decide what to major in if I don’t even know what I want my career to be yet?

Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

Texas Monthly Originally Posted: December 11, 2019 Andrew R. Graybill is professor of history and director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. On the eve of the publication of his new book about the Texas Revolution, Brian Kilmeade gave a promotional interview to his Fox News colleague Tucker Carlson. “All they wanted was a shot at success,” he said of the Anglo settlers who in the 1820s and 1830s flocked to what was then northern Mexico. “[T]hey said, ‘I’ll be a part of Mexico as long as you give us freedom and liberty.’” But, as Kilmeade explained to Carlson, when the Mexican government abrogated what the Americans believed were their rights—including unfettered immigration from the United States and [...]

By | 2019-12-12T09:09:49-08:00 December 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

First in her family, finding her place

SMU News Originally Posted: December 9, 2019 The daughter of a single mom who worked two jobs to support her family, Kaitlyn Contreras was determined to attend college. “I knew I wanted to go to college; I just didn’t know how,” she says. “But I followed the advice of my grandmother. She never went to school and never learned to read or write, but she taught me to always ask questions.” As an eighth-grader, Kaitlyn began asking questions, seeking a more challenging high school than the one in her neighborhood. What Kaitlyn couldn’t know then was that asking questions would open the door to unique opportunities. READ MORE

By | 2019-12-10T15:22:59-08:00 December 10th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Embrey Human Rights Events, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on First in her family, finding her place

Can Being Happy Really Be a Matter of Being Healthy?

Psychology Today Originally Posted: December 7, 2019 When you think about the features of your life that make you happy, you’re likely to count off such factors as how well your relationships are going, whether you have enough money to pay your bills, how you feel about your work, and whether you’re having a good day so far. How often, in this listing of contributors to your happiness, do you include how healthy you’re feeling? From the opposite perspective, if you’ve got a headache, a cold, or a sore toe, you’re probably not feeling all that happy. However, as soon as you’re better, you forget how much your body’s status affected that of your mind’s. What if your happiness was affected more by your overall [...]

By | 2019-12-09T07:52:15-08:00 December 9th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Can Being Happy Really Be a Matter of Being Healthy?

SMU study finds possible new way to treat HTLV-1 virus

Dallas Voice Originally Posted: December 6, 2019 A study led by SMU suggests that oleandrin — a drug derived from the Nerium oleander plant — could prevent the HTLV-1 virus from spreading by targeting a stage of the reproduction process that is not currently targeted by existing drugs. That is significant because there is currently no cure or treatment for the virus, which is related to HIV. About 38 million people have HIV worldwide while about 20 million people have the HTLV-1 virus. “Our research findings suggest that oleandrin could possibly limit the transmission and spread of HTLV-1 by targeting a unique stage in the retroviral life cycle,” said Robert Harrod, associate professor and director of Graduate Studies in SMU’s Department of Biological Sciences. Harrod is a [...]

By | 2019-12-09T07:49:52-08:00 December 9th, 2019|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU study finds possible new way to treat HTLV-1 virus

Texas has been ground zero for capital punishment for over 40 years

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: December 1, 2019 Dec. 1, Rick Halperin, director of the SMU Human Rights Program, co-authored by Roger C. Barnes for a piece about Texas being “ground zero” in the U.S. for carrying out capital punishment. Thus far in 2019, there have been 20 executions carried out in the United States. Eight of them have been in Texas. There are four more executions scheduled in the country by year’s end, and one of them is to be carried out in Texas. Since the death penalty in the U.S. was reinstated in 1976, there have been a total of 1,510 executions. A staggering 566 of them have been in Texas. In other words, Texas has been ground zero for capital punishment for over [...]

By | 2019-12-02T08:03:45-08:00 December 2nd, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Texas has been ground zero for capital punishment for over 40 years
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