About Katherine Nickles

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A local archaeologist wants you to understand how the field really works.

D Magazine Originally Posted: July 2020 Mark D. McCoy is a geospatial archaeologist and professor at SMU. Prior to our first meeting on campus, I had envisioned a dark office crowded with high-tech equipment and stacks of technical manuals. Instead, I walked into a light, airy space with a low-tech chalkboard and an approachable person who carries with him the sensibility of the sea. Raised in Delaware and educated in the States and New Zealand, McCoy focuses his efforts on Oceania. He has worked in the Hawaiian Islands, New Zealand, Pohnpei, and Palau. His new book, Maps for Time Travelers: How Archaeologists Use Technology to Bring Us Closer to the Past, is like the author: accessible. While the book takes on the esoteric subject of how [...]

By | 2020-07-13T06:26:52-07:00 July 13th, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on A local archaeologist wants you to understand how the field really works.

What white parents get wrong about raising antiracist kids — and how to get it right

Washington Post Originally Posted: June 25, 2020 The world feels broken right now — not just cracked in a few places but shattered in a million pieces. It’s been this way for centuries, of course, but many Americans — white Americans — are just starting to wake up and grapple with the depth of this country’s deeply rooted racism, as well as the role they played in making it so. As a white parent, I feel a deep responsibility to provide my children with the tools and awareness to help rebuild our society into something better. I know I’m not alone, but I also know many white parents don’t know how or where to start. Research suggests that we need to confront our unfounded assumptions [...]

By | 2020-06-30T09:46:56-07:00 July 9th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on What white parents get wrong about raising antiracist kids — and how to get it right

Predicting the outcome of the election is a fool’s errand — because of contingency

Washington Post Originally posted: July 6, 2020 We are living through the contingent moment to end all contingent moments. In early March, after a stunning turn of fortune, the presidential race seemed to crystallize. Either President Trump, whose approval ratings have always been low, would triumph due to the advantage of incumbency, a strong economy and an energized and devoted base of followers, or former vice president Joe Biden, who dominated Super Tuesday, would win as a kind of safe option for weary voters. Three months later, the election seems likely to be about the coronavirus pandemic and anti-racist uprisings — two huge events that were not on the political radar at the beginning of the year. But this isn’t as unusual as it seems. [...]

By | 2020-07-13T08:23:15-07:00 July 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, SW Center|Comments Off on Predicting the outcome of the election is a fool’s errand — because of contingency

How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: April 23, 2020 What if university computer scientists, biologists and historians collaborated to use modern artificial intelligence and machine learning to examine a massive trove of infectious disease research papers, text mining for abstract patterns, elusive insights and hard-to-spot trends related to COVID-19 and the coronavirus family of viruses? Imagine the energy such a group could generate if their students, working remotely and cut off from the normal distractions of student life, jumped in to volunteer for the project? Welcome to the nascent Southern Methodist University Artificial Intelligence Lab. READ MORE

By | 2020-06-30T09:30:04-07:00 July 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Should You Wear a Mask? Four North Texas Health Experts Say Yes

Dallas Observer Originally Posted: June 22, 2020 Despite last week's record number of new COVID cases statewide, many Texans have ditched wearing a mask out in public. It’s no wonder: Recommendations from health officials are being consistently subverted by some government authorities. Friday, Dallas County Commissioners approved an order that requires businesses to enforce mask wearing for employees and customers. Yet President Donald Trump and Gov. Greg Abbott have both made their disdain for facial coverings clear. Trump largely refuses to wear one and makes disparaging remarks about those who do. Abbott tried to keep municipal leaders from enforcing citywide mask mandates. READ MORE

By | 2020-06-30T09:14:27-07:00 June 30th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research|Comments Off on Should You Wear a Mask? Four North Texas Health Experts Say Yes

Carl Dorvil shares what he’s learned about creating something from nothing — and thriving even in hard times.

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: June 25, 2020 Carl Dorvil attended SMU on scholarships and graduated with degrees in public policy, economics and psychology, and then got his MBA. The DEC Network’s Fridays Are for Founders is a weekly virtual forum that gives entrepreneurs opportunities to learn from each other while struggling with the impacts of COVID-19. In this video, Trey Bowles and Delanie Majors talk to serial entrepreneur Carl Dorvil, who started tutoring and mentoring company Group Excellence (GEX) in 2004, while he was a junior at SMU. It was, at one time, the fastest growing public company in North Texas. After selling GEX, Dorvil went on to start other companies. Now he is partner and CEO of Dog for Dog, which he calls Toms [...]

By | 2020-06-29T10:08:23-07:00 June 29th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Economics, Psychology|Comments Off on Carl Dorvil shares what he’s learned about creating something from nothing — and thriving even in hard times.

Courageous Conversations: 9 Leaders Telling Brave Stories

Forbes Originally Posted: June 22, 2020 SMU alumna Neha Husein '19 is featured in this article. What is a courageous conversation that you have recently had? Courageous conversations are defined by the difficulty of the subject matter and the bravery of the subject discussing the topic. “Whether we’re leading companies, building our career, raising a family, or fighting for justice, we all need to be able to communicate when it’s uncomfortable, confusing, and difficult, and do it in a way that actually builds trust and strengthens our relationships,” shares Sofiya Deva of Warm Robots. Nine leaders and influencers were selected to be part of Warm Robots’ inaugural “Council of Courage” that who then offered their own experiences and definitions of what a courageous conversation is. [...]

By | 2020-06-26T08:48:02-07:00 June 26th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Embrey Human Rights Events|Comments Off on Courageous Conversations: 9 Leaders Telling Brave Stories

When memory and justice fail us

The Hill Originally Post: June 20, 2020 Holly Bowen is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at SMU Dallas where she teaches and directs research on topics including memory, emotion, motivation and aging. Think back to the last time you went on a mission to stock up on supplies due to COVID-19. What route did you take around the store? Can you describe the employee who bagged your groceries? What was the make and model of the car parked next to you? It’s likely this memory is difficult to retrieve and the details surrounding it have faded. After all, this was a stressful and uncertain time and your focus might have been elsewhere. It was some time ago and you have probably forgotten. Now, [...]

By | 2020-06-22T06:15:23-07:00 June 22nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on When memory and justice fail us
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