There’s a push for classes on the Bible in public schools. And there’s also a pushback

CNN

Originally Posted: May 7, 2019

Mark Chancey, an SMU professor of religious studies, was quoted in this article.

(CNN) — Legislators across the country have reignited the fight for, and debate over so-called “Bible literacy classes” — elective courses in public schools about Scriptures’ impact.

Alabama, Florida, Missouri, North Dakota, Virginia and West Virginia are among the states that have seen Bible literacy bills so far in 2019. Several of those efforts have fallen along the wayside.

While advocates for such classes believe students ought to be able to learn about the Bible’s influence on world history, culture and language, opponents tout separation of church and state and their concerns that teachers might possibly stray into proselytizing. READ MORE

 

By | 2019-05-09T10:13:10-07:00 May 9th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on There’s a push for classes on the Bible in public schools. And there’s also a pushback