These examples are from among the broad range of endowed faculty positions and endowed academic programs established through the campaign. View a complete list.

Innovative Human Rights Program

HumanRights

The Embrey Human Rights Program introduces students to the study of universally recognized civil, political, economic, social and cultural human rights and organizes travel to destinations where human rights abuses have occurred. Beginning with an initial gift from the Embrey Family Foundation, human rights has become one of the fastest growing programs on the SMU campus. The program grew from a $1 million gift in 2006 from the Embrey Family Foundation, prompted by the participation of Lauren Embrey ’80, ’06 in an SMU human rights program trip to Poland. With continued funding from the foundation and other donors, and with increased interest from students, the Embrey Human Rights Program expanded and SMU established a minor in human rights in 2007 and a major in 2011. The Foundation provided a gift toward the creation of a permanent endowment for the program in 2015.

Naming of Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

Simmons

In 2007 Harold C. and Annette Caldwell Simmons ’57 made a historic $20 million gift to SMU, which established endowments for the school of education and provided funding for its first building, Annette Caldwell Simmons Hall. In recognition of their commitment, SMU named the school the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. A 2013 gift from Mr. and Mrs. Simmons funded three new endowed academic positions in the School, as well as a second building for expanding programs. Mrs. Simmons wished to recognize her husband and his lifelong commitment to education by naming the building Harold Clark Simmons Hall.

Centennial Faculty Positions

(L-R, seated) Richard Templeton, president and CEO of Texas Instruments, and Mary Templeton. (L-R, standing) nephew William Templeton '16, son Jim Templeton '14 and daughter Stephanie Templeton.

(L-R, seated) Richard Templeton, president and CEO of Texas Instruments, and Mary Templeton. (L-R, standing) nephew William Templeton ’16, son Jim Templeton ’14 and daughter Stephanie Templeton.

During SMU’s centennial commemoration period from 2011 through 2015, donors established 19 centennial faculty positions (as well as nine centennial scholarships). Centennial endowments include funding to support the immediate needs of the position while the principal of the endowment matures. An example of a centennial chair, the Mary and Richard Templeton Centennial Chair of Electrical Engineering will support an outstanding faculty member in an academic discipline dedicated to designing the most sophisticated technology of the 21st century.