Scenes from COLLABO, showcasing collaborative art projects by professors, alumni, staff, and current students of the Meadows School and other schools across campus.

Collaboration and connection doesn’t end after four years.

Our students are highly successful. They are accepted to top graduate schools such as Cranbrook, The Art Institute of Chicago, Yale, Bard, Rutgers, Penn, Cal Arts, the University of Washington, The University of Chicago, Hunter College and the Slade School of Fine Art in London. They work as artists and exhibit throughout the world. They have won the Prix de Rome scholarship and Guggenheim, Fulbright, Javits, and U.S.-Japan fellowships, as well as major residencies. They are collected by museums and teach at top universities and high schools. They shape their communities through their art and through businesses in the arts. They run galleries, curate exhibitions, make movies and run design firms. They see, think, imagine, and MAKE. They shape their world and ours.

FEATURED | Recent Alumni


About JANA EVANS (B.F.A. Art ’02)

  • 2006 – 07 Post Baccalaureate at University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • 2007 – 10 MFA (Ceramics) Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona
  • 2010 – 12 Long Term Resident Artist at the Archie Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana
  • 2012 – 13 Resident Artist Pottery Northwest, Seattle, Washington
  • 2013 Adjunct Beginning Ceramics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • 2014 Resident Artist, Jingdezhen, China
  • 2015-2016 Career Resident at Red Star Studios/ Belger Craneyard Studios, Kansas City, Mo.

What are you working on now?

Founding member of Kansas City Urban Potters, established 2014.

Studio Potter 2001-present

How did SMU prepare you for your work life?

Starting in the freshman year, the two-semester Foundation class creates a space where experimentation and exploration of ideas and materials are encouraged by faculty and the students bond into a familial structure. With this in place, every advanced studio class is a mix of nurturing and perseverance. The instructors are all active in their fields and set a high precedent and the small class size allows for individual attention. The school values techniques and traditions of the past while exploring contemporary concepts, a truly balanced education so graduates are technically prepared and conceptually advanced.

What advice would you give students?

Don’t worry about the future and the “real world.” Take studio classes that interest you and stay a semester or a year longer to take a few other classes that interest you. The real world isn’t going anywhere and your time in college is to learn and explore. Take classes in Taos and abroad. Take the winter New York Colloquium class. Take risks. Go to a graduate program when you are ready, maybe right after your B.F.A., maybe not. Go to a graduate program you are passionate about, not one because you have a “full ride.”


 

About NICOLAS GONZALEZ (B.F.A. Art ’16)

  • 2015: SMU Engaged Learning Fellowship and Maguire Fellowship; Pike Park Summer Program artist, in collaboration with Associate Professor of Art History Janis Bergman-Carton, the Dallas Mexican-American Historical League (DMAHL), City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department, Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico and KERA TV/FM
  • 2015–16: “Experiencing Perspectives” exhibition hosted by Mercedes Benz Financial Services (MBFS), grand prize of $5,000; artwork acquired for permanent collection and displayed at MBFS
  • 2016: Inaugural recipient, Mary Vernon Painting Prize, Meadows School of the Arts
  • 2016–17: “Experiencing Perspectives” exhibition hosted by Mercedes Benz Financial Services (MBFS); artwork acquired for permanent collection and displayed at MBFS
  • 2017: Art instructor, Big Thought’s Creative Solutions program
  • 2017–18: “Experiencing Perspectives” exhibition hosted by Mercedes Benz Financial Services (MBFS), second prize of $2,500
  • 2017–18: Art instructor, Dallas Can Academy Accelerating Campus Excellence (ACE) program
  • 2018: Business Council for the Arts – Dallas, Hispanic Heritage exhibition, Capital One Plano Conference Center
  • 2018–19: “Experiencing Perspectives” exhibition hosted by the Mercedes Benz Financial Services (MBFS)

What are you working on now?

I am a co-founder of Gallery 86, established in 2017 as an online gallery created by four fraternity brothers of Sigma Lambda Beta. Currently, we are creating and submitting an idea to the City of Dallas Cultural Affairs department for a public artwork focused on the memory of Santos Rodriguez. We are also creating an exhibition wherein each member produces 10 pieces of artwork focused on their own individual theme. I am working on an art portfolio at Brookhaven College under my painting professor and SMU alumnus Chong Chu (B.F.A. Studio Art ’82), to use for application to graduate school in 2020.

How did SMU prepare you for your work life?

My education introduced me to themes in art such as systems, spaces and narratives. These themes alone have expanded my work immensely and given me a better understanding of other artists and their intentions in their bodies of work. Through the Meadows art program, I’ve also become familiar with how galleries function, how artists work together with galleries and how business is conducted between the two. All of my teaching opportunities, both inside and outside of SMU, are a result of networking through SMU. These opportunities have greatly grown my desire to become a painting or drawing professor. I’m a firm believer in SMU’s motto, “World Changers Shaped Here.”

What advice would you give students?

I advise them to build relationships with fellow students and professors. Networking has been my number one resource in continuing to move forward. Take the initiative to be involved in different programs inside and outside of campus. It is important to continually expand your perspective, so that you can build a better understanding of others and their vision. The education you come to possess will be a reflection of not only your professors, but of how ambitious you were to learn. The amount of work you put in will generate the amount of success you obtain. Don’t be discouraged by failure, for lessons and understanding subsequently materialize. Monumental accomplishments take years of practice, dedication, perseverance, sweat, blood and tears.


About ANGIE REISCH (B.F.A. Art ’18)

  • 2017: Co-founder of DADE Collective, an art collective of women and femme artists, with fellow co-founders Diana Antohe (’14), DS Chapman (’17) and Ellen Smith (’15). The collective produces an annual publication of art and writing from non-male artists and writers, titled Holding Pattern.
  • 2017: Mary Vernon Painting Prize
  • 2018: Nasher Sculpture Center Microgrant Recipient
  • 2018: Dallas Museum of Art Kimbrough Artist Award

What are you working on now?

Programs Manager at Business Council for the Arts, hired in 2018.

How did SMU prepare you for your work life?

I think my experience at SMU pushed me to begin thinking for myself and, very simply, prepared me to work really hard in everything that I do. I learned how to seek out opportunities rather than wait for them and ask for help to make projects I was working on happen.

What advice would you give students?

Get out into the community, go to every show you can, experiment, collaborate with your fellow students, introduce yourself to people and ask about their work, invite people into your studio, apply for grant money (this is a big one because you have so many resources for funding your projects while you’re still a student at SMU — use them!). In other words, just because you’re still a student, it doesn’t mean you have to hold back. Don’t wait to get involved.

FEATURED STORY: SMU Meadows Scholar Angelica Reisch Knows The Importance of Community Involvement


About DAVID SMITH (B.F.A. Art; B.A. Creative Computing ’17)

  • Retired U.S. Armed Forces Officer – 21+ year career on active duty.
  • U.S. Army – 1992-2000
  • U.S. Coast Guard – 2002-14
  • See: My faculty page | My personal site

What are you working on now?

DGS Creative, LLC., Artist, my professional art practice since 2017

SMU Meadows School of the Arts Creative Computing Center, Adjunct Undergraduate Lecturer in Creative Computing, 2017–current

How did SMU prepare you for your work life?

Combining art with technology is something I learned at SMU through the completion of these two degrees.  This new knowledge and my previous experiences as a military officer have helped me be an effective educator and advocate/mentor for the students in my courses. Several key professors in the programs I completed are now my mentors, and they help me with their advice today, even long after the diplomas were handed out.

What advice would you give students?

Forge personal relationships with the professors that you relate to. Adopt them as your mentors. Take advantage of the great opportunity afforded to you by your chance to receive a formal education at a very reputable institution like SMU. Learn how to organize yourself and your schedule, and how to conduct yourself professionally. Always keep in mind that people are the most important aspect of any organization, institution or undertaking. Learn to respect yourself and others in everything you do.  Combine all of that with what you learn in class and you are sure to succeed at anything you pursue.

FEATURED STORY: David Gail Smith chats about his transition Army/Coastguard Veteran to Artist


About OLIVIA SMITH (B.F.A. Art ’11)

2013–16 Director, Exhibition A, museum-quality contemporary art editions

What are you working on now?

2016–Present, Co-founder and Director, Magenta Plains contemporary art gallery

How did SMU prepare you for your work life?

The SMU art department not only gave me a solid fine art foundation in painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography and video but also supported my ideas and provided a place free of strict boundaries where I was encouraged to experiment and initiate interdisciplinary projects. Now that I am a gallery director representing 10 artists ages 31–88 years old, I often recall my time interfacing with peers, visiting artists and professors during undergrad.

What advice would you give students?

Meet regularly with professors and ask questions, identify like-minded peers and begin a club or association together, and be as generative in your work as possible. Learn as much as you can from the people around you in Meadows, whether or not they are in your same department.

FEATURED STORY: How to Get Your Art into Galleries and Exhibitions 


About ANDREW WICK (B.F.A. Art ’03)

  • A Very Grand Opening, Dahlia Woods Gallery, San Marcos, Texas, March 24, 2016–April 14, 2016
  • Infinite Meridian: Selected Paintings by Andrew P. Wick and Drawings by Benjamin Bascombe, Eisemann Center: Forrest and Virginia Green Mezzanine Gallery, Richardson, Texas, September 21–October 29, 2011
  • Mad About Art: A Holiday Group Show, Dahlia Woods Gallery, Dallas, December 10–31, 2010
  • Earth and Sky: Landscapes by Katie Maratta and Andrew Wick, Dahlia Woods Gallery, Dallas, November 5–December 4, 2010
  • Hot Time, Summer in the City: Summer Group Show, Dahlia Woods Gallery, Dallas, June 11–August, 2010
  • Art for the Masses: A Holiday Group Show, Dahlia Woods Gallery, Dallas, December 5, 2009–January 30, 2010
  • Slow Cooked and Hickory Smoked: A Group Show, Dahlia Woods Gallery, Dallas, July 10–August 15, 2009
  • Smoke and Mirrors – Jamie Pink/Andrew Wick, Dahlia Woods Gallery, Dallas, April 17–May 16, 2009
  • Going Native: A Group Show, Dahlia Woods Gallery, Dallas, December 5, 2008–January 3, 2009
  • The South Press Printastic Printacular, Carillon Gallery, Fort Worth, Texas, November 14–December 6, 2007
  • Plano ISD Annual Staff Art Shows, Plano ISD Administration building, Plano, Texas, 2005–07
  • Works Not For Sale, UNT SOVA, Denton, Texas, 2004
  • Alleged Junctions: Recent Works by Andrew Wick and Benjamin Bascombe, Mary Hay Gallery, Dallas, 2003
  • Plano Art Association: National Juried Competition. Plano Art Centre, Plano, Texas, 2003
  • Senior Class Exhibition, Part I. Doolin Gallery, SMU Meadows School of the Arts, Dallas, 2002
  • Like Mom Used To Make, Greer Garson Theatre Sculpture exhibit, SMU Meadows School of the Arts, Dallas, Texas, 2000
  • Young Master’s Group Exhibition, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, 1999
  • Dallas Horticultural Center at Fair Park, Dallas, 1998
  • Young Master’s Group Exhibition, graphite on paper, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, 1997–98

What are you working on now?

I currently teach art in the Plano ISD. I started in 2005, right after graduate school at University of North Texas. I also teach Introduction to Drawing in the community education program at SMU.

How did SMU prepare you for your work life?

SMU gave me a strong background in craft and I was able to experiment in a variety of media. I was drawn specifically to drawing and printmaking but took painting courses as well. The smaller classes and the professors I had, some of whom are still friends to this day, helped prepare me for my career in the arts.

What advice would you give students?

I’m a big believer in a liberal arts education and SMU has that. I would say that art students should keep their options wide open. Gaining a variety of skills can help one not only in their formal skills as an artist but in their developing philosophy as well. Dedicating time to the course one takes that interests them is great. But it is also important to get outside of the “comfort zone” and allow the challenge of finding new things that help one’s craft, perhaps in unexpected ways. That class one may be reluctant about may just give valuable career skills.