SAS@SMU | After ISIS

Thursday, April 6, 2017 (12:00 PM – 1:30 PM)
Great Hall, Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall (map)


Join us for lunch April 6 as experts discuss what the Middle East might look like after the demise of ISIS.


James L. Gelvin, Professor of History, UCLA

Gelvin is Professor of Modern Middle Eastern History at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received his B.A. from Columbia University, his Master’s in International Affairs from the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, and his Ph.D. from Harvard University. He has taught at Boston College, Harvard University, MIT, and the American University in Beirut.  A specialist in the modern social and cultural history of the Arab East, he is author of five books: The New Middle East: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2017); The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2012, 2015); The Modern Middle East: A History (Oxford University Press, 2004, 2007, 2011, 2015); The Israel-Palestine Conflict: One Hundred Years of War (Cambridge University Press, 2005, 2007, 2014); and Divided Loyalties: Nationalism and Mass Politics in Syria at the Close of Empire (University of California Press, 1998), along with numerous articles and chapters in edited volumes. He is also co-editor of Global Muslims in the Age of Steam and Print, 1850-1930 (University of California Press, 2013).  In 2015, the Middle East Studies Association awarded Gelvin its Undergraduate Education Award.


Henri Barkey, Director of Middle East Program, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Barkey is the Director of the Middle East Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He is the former Bernard L. and Bertha F. Cohen Professor at Lehigh University. Barkey is also a former public policy scholar at the Wilson Center. His most recent works include Turkey’s Syria Predicament (Survival, 2014) and Iraq, Its Neighbors and the United States, co-edited with Phebe Marr and Scott Lasensky (Washington, DC: United States Institute of Peace, 2011). He served as a member of the U.S. State Department Policy Planning Staff working primarily on issues related to the Middle East, the Eastern Mediterranean, and intelligence from 1998 to 2000.


Moderator: Sabri Ates, Professor, SMU

Ates is an Associate Professor at SMU’s Clements Department of History. Ates’ research focuses on Ottoman-Iranian relations, Kurdish history, borderlands and the borderland peoples, and the history of sectarianism in the Middle East.His first book Tunalı Hilmi Bey: Osmanlıdan Cumhuriyet’e Bir Aydın,(Istanbul: Iletişim Yayınları, 2009), examines competing projects of Ottoman intellectuals to keep the disparate parts of the Empire together, as well as their responses to the age of nationalism and the birth of the Turkish Republic. Partially based on his award-winning dissertation, his second book,Ottoman-Iranian Borderlands: Making a Boundary(Cambridge University Press, 2013) discusses the process of making of the boundaries that modern states of Iraq, Turkey and Iran share. At present Ates is working on his new project, Sheikh Abdulqadir Nehri (d. 1925) and the Pursuit of an Independent Kurdistan. The book explores the quest for a Kurdish state between 1880-1925, when the creation of such a state emerged as a distinct possibility and then quickly unraveled.


The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are required.

RegisterIf you are interested in joining the Tower Center Forum, please contact us at tower@smu.edu.


In collaboration with SMU Honors Program


sasThe Security and Strategy Program at the Tower Center serves to raise student and public awareness of national and international security affairs. Our principal mission is to prepare SMU undergraduates to become leaders in government service, academia, and industry. We offer a rigorous and demanding set of courses on international relations, national security policy, strategy, American foreign policy, and the politics of military force. The Tower Center also gives students the opportunity to interact with policymakers, military officers, intelligence officials, and diplomats.

The United States has become increasingly active in regional conflicts since the end of the Cold War, and it invests enormous resources into projecting American power abroad. SAS@SMU encourages a vigorous debate on this investment. Along with the annual Tower Center National Security Conference, we organize regular forums and seminars that give the public the chance to converse with leading scholars about cutting edge research in security studies, as well as with government officials and defense industry executives.