Hilltop on the Hill 2013

Eight students are in Washington, D.C., in October 2013 as part of SMU’s Hilltop on the Hill program. The students will visit media and government sites, and meet with political communicators, journalists and SMU alumni. The trip is led by Rita Kirk, professor of communication studies in Meadows School of the Arts and director of the Maguire Center for Ethics & Public Responsibility; Sandra Duhé, chair of communication studies, associate professor and director of the Meadows School’s public relations program; and Candy Crespo, assistant director of the Maguire Center for Ethics & Public Responsibility. Endowed by the Bauer Foundation, the Hilltop on the Hill program also takes students studying political communication to political party conventions, the presidential Inauguration and the G8 Economic Summit.

How the media make memories that last

An update from Sasha, a senior majoring in corporate communications in Meadows School of the Arts and Spanish in Dedman College: It is incredible the way our memories work. We can spend hours in a classroom hearing the same thing over and over again and still never be able to recall that information, but it only takes a split second looking at an image of two flaming towers in New York to forever remember a moment of terror. The news is one of those things that create memory for us. How is it that we hardly remember what was in the Dallas Morning News this morning, but we can tell you all about Monica Lewinsky or OJ Simpson? The way [...]

2013-10-15T12:00:07+00:00 October 14th, 2013|Hilltop on the Hill 2013|

Lessons from a global local PR company

An update from Briana, a sophomore Hunt Scholar majoring in political science in Dedman College and communication studies in Meadows School of the Arts:  “Only a life lived for others is a life worth living.” Albert Einstein’s words elicit the type of company Edelman is with its concern for its clients' cultivation of ethics and integrity as well as for maintaining its own principle values. Edelman PR is the definition of a global local company. Edelman has 67 offices around the world — demonstrating the breadth of the company — and yet it also has a sense of genuine authenticity — illustrating its depth. While at Edelman, we, the Hilltop students, spoke with four people, two of whom are SMU alumni [...]

2013-10-28T11:20:59+00:00 October 14th, 2013|Hilltop on the Hill 2013|

‘Too Long Have Others Spoken for Us’

An update from Alexandra, a junior majoring in psychology and English with a minor in women's and gender studies in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences: What do Susan B. Anthony, Randy Shilts, and Ida B. Wells have in common, besides lives devoted to advocating for minority groups? I answered that question today while exploring a display titled “Too Long Have Others Spoken For Us” in the Newseum, a museum of news and journalism in the heart of Washington, D.C. There, I learned that all three activists created their own publications in order to more effectively advocate for social issues. A photo of the exhibit honoring Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony’s contributions to women’s suffrage, which ultimately led [...]

2013-10-14T11:31:18+00:00 October 14th, 2013|Hilltop on the Hill 2013|

9/11 through a media lens

An update from Katelyn, a junior double-majoring in journalism and theatre in Meadows School of the Arts, with a special emphasis in international politics in Dedman College: We spent two or so hours Sunday wandering the Newseum on Pennsylvania Avenue – a museum I had never visited nor knew extensively about. Its exhibits are all from the perspective of media. History-changing journalists, coverage, First Amendment rights, etc. But as I explored on my own, I found myself completely enamored by the 9/11 Gallery at the end of the fourth floor walk. What drew me in initially was the floor-to-ceiling display of newspaper headlines from around the world depicting the coverage immediately following Sept. 11. Newspapers not only from the U.S., [...]

2013-10-22T15:57:09+00:00 October 14th, 2013|Hilltop on the Hill 2013|

Journalism during the Civil War

An update from Briana, a sophomore Hunt Scholar majoring in political science in Dedman College and communication studies in Meadows School of the Arts:  “Without a struggle, there can be no progress.” Frederick Douglass’s claim harmonizes with the exact phenomenon journalists felt during the Civil War. A sense of veracity and perseverance was instilled after this life-changing historical period. The Civil War was a trying time in America’s social and cultural history. We fought against those that were once a part of our country and experienced a war on our nation’s soil. The Civil War exhibit in the Newseum evidences that journalists certainly did face challenges when covering different events caused by the Civil War. The exhibit is arranged where [...]

2013-10-14T23:26:52+00:00 October 14th, 2013|Hilltop on the Hill 2013|

Sacrifices made for freedom

An update from Lauren, a sophomore majoring in political science in Dedman College and public relations in Meadows School of the Arts: While at the Newseum today, I saw some incredible and extraordinarily powerful photographs and memorials. One of the photos that stuck with me the most was "The Soiling of Old Glory" by Stanley Forman. It depicts a white man about to attack a black man with the American flag. The symbolism of the photo was incredible. It was taken in 1976, which was 11 years after the Civil Rights Act of 1965, and published in the Boston Herald. The photo shows how many people thought that denying people civil rights was the American thing to do, and the [...]

2013-10-22T15:41:09+00:00 October 13th, 2013|Hilltop on the Hill 2013|

Fighting with words

An update from Elena, a senior majoring in corporate communications in Meadows School of the Arts and business in the Cox School of Business: As society evolves, intrinsically some things never change – like the news. Since the adoption and enforcement of the First Amendment, news headlines have changed very little. The art of attention grabbing is an age-old tradition; readers in the pre-Revolutionary era craved an interesting story, just like readers today. One difference that really shines at the Newseum is the name of major news sources in the pre-Revolutionary era. “The Crisis” published articles headlined “A Bloody Court, A Bloody Military, and A Bloody Parliament.” These media used linguistics to highlight the turmoil the United States faced and [...]

2013-10-22T15:31:36+00:00 October 13th, 2013|Hilltop on the Hill 2013|
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