Author Archives: Denise Gee

About Denise Gee

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A Second Look at ‘Manifest Destiny’

From “American West” trip participant Paul Lake of Dallas: This trip has been an amazing learning adventure. My fellow travelers are bright and fun. I’ve learned much from all of them. All of the sites confirmed my belief of how badly … Continue reading

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The Grace of Sacred Grounds

Shared by graduate student Denise N., studying human rights & social justice and American studies: Walking the sacred grounds of the Washita is an honor. The area is so beautiful, and with the recent rains, lush. A quiet calm is … Continue reading

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‘Eerily Quiet’ at Sand Creek Massacre Site

An observation from Bettye H., a Master of Liberal Arts student at SMU: Although the history of the massacre at Sand Creek is tragic and heartbreaking, the fact that so few people know about it is worse. Walking along the … Continue reading

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Exposing a Romanticized ‘Wild West’

Thirteen SMU students and faculty and staff members will travel the American West June 2–12 to visit Native American reservations and historic sites “to study past and present struggles of our country’s indigenous people – all too often our forgotten people,” says Rick Halperin, director of SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program, sponsoring the trip for the first time. While in Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota and Nebraska the group will visit such places as the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota and the site of the Battle of Little Big Horn in Montana. Continue reading

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‘The People Who Died Here Have Not Been Forgotten’

An update from Vanna, a MLS student in the Simmons School of Education: The Killing Fields memorial of Choeunh Ek, Cambodia, is the final resting ground for over one million victims of the Khmer Rouge. Men, women and children were … Continue reading

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Life, and Lives Lost, in Perspective

An update from Kendell, a freshman dance major at SMU: Dec. 27, 2014: We began our day with a visit to the Schindler Museum in Krakow, Poland. We learn a lot about the city’s history as well as the heroic … Continue reading

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At Stutthof: Learning and Remembering

An update from Jayce, a junior majoring in accounting and mathematics at SMU: First day, first camp. Stutthof. I’m not sure what to expect. Like most people, all I really know is that Hitler ordered the extermination of millions of … Continue reading

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Exposure

A hooded down coat, three layers of clothing underneath it, a wool hat, two scarves, waterproof gloves, two pairs of socks, rugged wool-lined boots and foot/hand warmers are still not enough insulation as we plod through the snowy (yet thankfully … Continue reading

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Recipes for Survival

One of the most powerful displays at Auschwitz, and one of its most sickening, is a darkened room piled to the ceiling with human hair. Behind an expanse of glass is nearly two tons of it, some of it still … Continue reading

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Remembrance & Respect

                  At each Holocaust memorial site, one of us lights a candle on behalf of everyone in our group. Afterward, one of several Jewish friends traveling with us reads aloud from the “Kaddish” prayer … Continue reading

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