Human Rights in Baltics

During Spring Break 2010, students, faculty and staff are visiting World War II sites in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, including the Bikernieki Memorial, where 40,000 Jews were slain; the Jewish Museum in Riga; and the Jungfernhof concentration camp. Rick Halperin, director of the Human Rights Education Program in Dedman College, is leading the group.

Read more from Human Rights in Baltics

Monuments in Estonia

An update from Adele, a senior sociology major with minors in history and human rights:

023.jpg Today we began visiting Holocaust sites. We first met up with our local guide and went to see the old prison. At one point, this prison had been used to temporarily hold Jewish men waiting to be executed.

030.jpg We then took the van outside of Tallinn to the Kalevi-Litva memorial, where we were informed that about 6,000 Jews and other persecuted groups were killed. While we stood in the snow and looked around at the quiet forest, the enormity of the place struck me.

This site, which most Estonians don’t even know about, also had the only Estonian monument to Romas killed in the Holocaust. The killers, mostly Estonian Nazi collaborators, set up machine guns along the hills and simply shot down the victims in this isolated location.

There are simply no words to describe the experience of standing in that spot.

034.jpg We then went to the monument built to remember those killed at Klooga. This was a work camp until the end of the war. When the Nazis knew the Soviet army was on its way, they began killing the inmates indiscriminately.

Visiting both of these monuments was a little hard to take in.

Share this story:

    About Sarah Hanan

    EA-PubAffairs(Periodicals)
    This entry was posted in Human Rights in Baltics. Bookmark the permalink.