Julia SMU-in-Paris

Julia is a junior from Plano majoring in history, with a French minor, and is a member of the University Honors Program. She is studying abroad with SMU-in-Paris in fall 2007.

Read more from Julia SMU-in-Paris

I’m Thankful for … the Eiffel Tower?

This past Thursday was Thanksgiving. It was the first time I’ve ever spent Thanksgiving apart from my family. Even though Thanksgiving isn’t a very big deal in my family, as there are only three of us, I still found myself a little down and out to be away from my family during the first of the holiday season.

Thanksgiving is a hard concept to explain …
Earlier this week I was attempting to explain Thanksgiving to Anne-Marie’s 10-year-old grandson. In the middle of giving a brief history lesson about the Pilgrams and the Indians, I realized that there’s a lot more to Thanksgiving than I really ever think about. While technically Thanksgiving is a day that we, as a nation, are supposed to have a feast in honor of the first pilgrims who settled in America, in the past few centuries the holiday has taken on a much more broad meaning to Americans.
I explained to Anne-Marie’s grandson that really Thanksgiving is a day where families come together, stuff their faces with good food, and enjoy each others’ company. He seemed satisfied with my definition, and so did I. Thanksgiving is truly an American tradition, and unless someone is an American, I’m not sure one can truly understand the logic behind Thanksgiving.

A French Thanksgiving
SMU arranged for a Thanksgiving dinner for all of the students. The food was advertised as “real American home cooking,” and while they attempted the traditional turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, and cranberry sauce, the results were a little different. The turkey was all dark meat, and as a fan of white meat I was a little disappointed, however it made me open my horizons a bit. The mashed potatoes had a sprinkle of sugar in them. I’m pretty sure the restaurant was trying to re-create the traditional “yams,” but someone should have told them it’s only proper to put sugar on sweet potatoes, not white fluffy ones. The most interesting part of all was dessert. I expected one-fourth of the pie like I normally eat on Thanksgiving, but to my disappointment, I got only a sliver of pecan pie. Luckily, I chose the right pie, as I heard the pumpkin one lacked any sort of flavor.

While the food was less than phenomenal, it was really nice to be with my friends on Thanksgiving and feel like a little family celebrating Thanksgiving. I was very happy that Dr. Roynier arranged for this!

Share this story:

    About Sarah Hanan

    EA-PubAffairs(Periodicals)
    This entry was posted in Julia SMU-in-Paris. Bookmark the permalink.