SMU Magazine

SMU Magazine is updated monthly on this website and the print edition is published each spring and fall.

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Polishing a diamond in the rough

When Dylan DeMuth ’17 was a sophomore, Professor Eric Bing helped him “re-choreograph” his life. Now the graduating senior has conducted his own research and assisted his mentor in developing a strengths-based leadership program aimed at young people working to improve health in impoverished communities in the U.S. and Africa.

2017-05-10T11:28:03+00:00 May 8, 2017|

Reaching 100, Staying Young

"Universities do not grow old; but yearly they renew their strength and live from age to age in immortal youth." With that statement in 1913, SMU’s first president, Robert Stewart Hyer, made a commitment for SMU in his time, but affirmed that we would be a university for all time. Reflecting that vision, SMU has built upon its initial offerings in the liberal arts as the core of the University along with programs in theology and music. We have remained young and nimble in developing professional education to serve a changing region, nation and world, adding programs in the sciences, business, engineering, law, communications and other applied areas of learning. Today, part of SMU’s uniqueness comes from the fusion of our liberal arts core with pre-professional and professional programs through our seven schools. We celebrated this tradition of looking forward as we marked the 100th anniversary of SMU’s founding April 15. At a briefing that day, I shared a wealth of good news with our alumni and friends: Cox School of Business is one of the few in the nation to have three M.B.A. programs ranked in the top 15 by Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Dedman School of Law ranks among the nation’s top 50 law schools in U.S. News & World Report. In another ranking, our Ph.D. program in theology and religion, offered jointly by Perkins School of Theology and the Department of Religious Studies in Dedman College, is ranked [...]

2017-04-04T10:25:32+00:00 June 1, 2011|

Programs, Professors Cultivate Next-Generation Entrepreneurs

  A thread of entrepreneurship weaves through the history of SMU from the beginning. In asking “What is our duty to all the coming generations of Texans until the end of time? … ,” members of the Commission of Education, Methodist Episcopal Church, South of Texas demonstrated game-changing foresight in 1911. They spotted an opportunity in a growing city and joined forces with like-minded civic leaders to bring the University to life. Fast forward six decades: When the Caruth Institute for Entrepreneurship opened in August 1970, “we could identify only a handful of universities that even taught a course in entrepreneurship,” says Jerry White, director of the institute in the Cox School of Business. “Today, if you don’t have a substantial entrepreneurship education program, then you won’t have a business school.” The institute was established with the support of W.W. Caruth Jr., son of W.W. Caruth Sr., who donated land to SMU in 1911. “W.W. Caruth Jr. felt that universities were training students to be employees of large organizations, and that’s not what he chose to be,” White says. “He was ahead of the curve in recognizing that business schools needed to address entrepreneurship education.” While White says there’s no hard and fast definition of “entrepreneurship,” he boils it down to “building a business where none existed before and pursuing the opportunity without regard to resources you currently control.” “Innovation is not entrepreneurship,” [...]

2017-04-04T10:28:37+00:00 June 1, 2011|
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