research update

Trouble In Paradise: Domestic Violence In South Pacific Islands

Research by SMU cultural anthropologist Victoria Lockwood will take her to the remote tropical islands of Tubuai and Rurutu this summer.

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Exploring The Biblical Landscape

The remains of Greek and Roman theatres, temples, bathhouses and roads in Israel have provided important clues to Mark Chancey about the transformation of Jewish culture during the 600-year Greco-Roman period (300 BCE to 300 CE).

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The Search For Energy As Common As Hot Water

SMU’s geothermal energy team of faculty and graduate students is aiming to prevent the Northern Mariana Islands’ economic oblivion by helping to convert their volcanic heat into affordable, renewable energy.

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How Much Is A Species Worth? Understanding The Economics Of Conservation

Understanding the market forces that drive environmental decisions is a vital yet
missing piece of public policy on natural resource management, says Santanu Roy, SMU professor of economics and 2007-08 Ford Research Fellow.

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Stopping The AIDS Scourge Through A Genetic Disorder

Robert Harrod, assistant professor of biological sciences, and his research team study Werner syndrome enzyme link to HIV inhibition.

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Taking The Political Pulse With Real-time Response

Professor Rita Kirk and Assistant Professor Dan Schill developed the idea of giving voters a voice in network coverage through real-time response focus groups.

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Countering Diabetes: From Central Arizona To South Dallas

Shawna, a pregnant Pima Indian, calls diabetes a scourge. "Diabetes is a sign that this life we’re living isn’t our life," she says. "The one our ancestors had was way better."

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The Body Project: Learning To Love The Skin They’re In

Popular culture’s image of the 21st-century woman is tall, large-breasted, narrow-hipped and ultra-slender. Like cultural standards of beauty throughout history, today’s "thin ideal" is unattainable for most women; for many, it also can be destructive.

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Digging Archaeology – Taos Project Requires Hard Work, Soft Skills

For hundreds of years the beauty and mystery of Taos, New Mexico, have lured thousands of settlers and visitors, from the ancestors of the Taos and Picuris Indians and Spanish settlers to skiing enthusiasts and artists.

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Crossing America’s Borders, Mixing Cultures

The United States still shines as a beacon to millions of citizens of other countries, many of whom continue to make their way to its borders. Currently the nation is experiencing the largest wave of immigration in its history: 12.4 percent of U.S. residents are immigrants; each year 1 million immigrants arrive legally and 300,000 to 500,000 arrive illegally.

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