Wall Street Journal: For better talk therapy, try taking a nap

Thomas Ritz

Psychotherapy sessions are best in the morning when levels of helpful hormone are high

Patients make more progress toward overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when their therapy sessions are scheduled in the morning, new research suggests. An SMU study found that morning sessions helped psychotherapy patients overcome their panic and anxiety and phobic avoidance better, in part, because levels of cortisol — a naturally occurring hormone — are at their highest then, said clinical psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

$2 million NIH grant to help team from SMU and U-Maryland develop pediatric asthma monitor

Two SMU psychology professors working with University of Maryland engineers have been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant that will bring nearly $2 million to their joint project to create a wearable device for pediatric asthma patients that helps them avoid asthma triggers. The asthma device will monitor air quality, carbon dioxide levels in the blood, physical activity and other stimuli to identify triggers and alert a patient when conditions are ripe for an attack.

Asthma patients reduce symptoms, improve lung function with shallow breaths, more CO2

Asthma patients taught to habitually resist the urge to take deep breaths when experiencing symptoms were rewarded with fewer symptoms and healthier lung function, according to a new study from the Department of Psycholgoy at Southern Methodist University. The findings are from a large clinical trial funded with a grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Oprah.com: Stress Myths — Debunked!

Health journalist Corrie Pikul wrote about the groundbreaking panic and anxiety research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret and Dr. Thomas Ritz in a Jan. 7 post on Oprah.com. The article, "Stress Myths—Debunked!," cites the startling findings of Meuret's anxiety research, which has found that the standard advice to "take a deep breath" actually makes such situations worse.

Prevention: Anxiety Is Draining Your Brain, But It Doesn’t Have To

Health journalist Markham Heid wrote about the groundbreaking panic and anxiety research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret and Dr. Thomas Ritz in the June 2012 issue of Prevention magazine. The article "Anxiety Is Draining Your Brain, But It Doesn't Have To" cites Meuret's anxiety research disputing the standard advice to "take a deep breath."

Baylor Innovations: Don’t Panic, New Research Shows That Panic Attacks Are Not As Spontaneous As Once Thought

The%20Wall%20Street%20Journal.jpgBaylor Innovations, the quarterly magazine of Baylor Health Care System, featured the groundbreaking panic attack research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret, Dr. David Rosenfield and Dr. Thomas Ritz. The Spring 2012 article by health and science writer Mark Cantrell, titled "Don't Panic: New Research Shows That Panic Attacks Are Not As Spontaneous As Once Thought" details the startling findings of Meuret's published study showing significant physiological instability in advance of so-called out-of-the-blue panic attacks.

HHS Healthbeat: Predicting Panic Attacks

Panic%20attack.jpgNicholas Garlow with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services created a podcast about the groundbreaking panic attack research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret, Dr. David Rosenfield and Dr. Thomas Ritz.

The Sept. 22 podcast "Predicting Panic Attacks" details the startling findings of Meuret's newest published study showing significant physiological instability in advance of so-called out-of-the-blue panic attacks.

Read the text.

Listen to the podcast.

The Wall Street Journal: Seeing Signs of a Panic Attack Before One Happens

The%20Wall%20Street%20Journal.jpgScience journalist Ann Lukits wrote about the groundbreaking panic attack research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret, Dr. David Rosenfield and Dr. Thomas Ritz in the The Wall Street Journal. The Sept. 20 article "Seeing Signs of a Panic Attack Before One Happens" details the startling findings of Meuret's newest published study showing significant physiological instability in advance of so-called out-of-the-blue panic attacks.

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