SMU Department of Psychology

Huffington Post: Women’s Body Image Relies On Men’s Opinion, Study Finds

Meltzer, SMU, women, body image, men, self esteemThe popular news site Huffington Post reported on the research of SMU social psychologist Andrea L. Meltzer led a series of studies that found that telling women that men desire larger women who aren’t model-thin made the women feel better about their own weight.

Findings suggest a woman’s body image is strongly linked to her perception of what she thinks men prefer. The researchers found that how women perceive men’s preferences influenced each woman’s body image independent of her actual body size. Continue reading

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U.S. News: When Women Think Men Prefer Bigger Gals, They’re Happier With Their Weight

Meltzer, SMU, USNews, bigger women, self-esteem, menHealthDay writer Robert Preidt reported on the research of SMU social psychologist Andrea L. Meltzer for the news site U.S. News & World Report. Meltzer led a series of studies that found that telling women that men desire larger women who aren’t model-thin made the women feel better about their own weight.

The findings suggest a woman’s body image is strongly linked to her perception of what she thinks men prefer. The researchers found that how women perceive men’s preferences influenced each woman’s body image independent of her actual body size.
Continue reading

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The Atlantic: Women’s Self-Esteem and What Men Want

The Atlantic, Andrea Meltzer, Julie Beck, large-body women, men, self-esteemThe Atlantic reported on the research of SMU psychologist Andrea Meltzer, lead author on a new series of studies that found that telling women that men desire larger women who aren’t model-thin made the women feel better about their own weight.

Results suggest a woman’s body image is strongly linked to her perception of what she thinks men prefer. The researchers found that how women perceive men’s preferences influenced each woman’s body image independent of her actual body size and weight. Continue reading

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Women who are told men desire women with larger bodies are happier with their weight

SMU, women, body image, MeltzerTelling women that men desire larger women who aren’t model-thin made the women feel better about their own weight in a series of new studies from Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

Results of the three independent studies suggest a woman’s body image is strongly linked to her perception of what she thinks men prefer, said social psychologist Andrea Meltzer, lead researcher on the study. Continue reading

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Study: Contraception may change how happy women are with their husbands

Andrea Meltzer, contraception, marital satisfactionChoosing a partner while on the pill may affect a woman’s marital satisfaction, according to a new study from Florida State University and Southern Methodist University.

In fact, the pill may be altering how attractive a woman finds a man. Continue reading

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Christian Science Monitor: To spank or not to spank — corporal punishment in the US

George Holden, spanking, corporal punishment, Christian Science MonitorReporter Stephanie Hanes for The Christian Science Monitor interviewed SMU psychologist and child development expert George W. Holden for his perspective on corporal punishment. Holden, a noted expert on the dangers of corporal punishment, is a leader of the nation’s anti-spanking movement.

The Oct. 19 article explores the controversial practice of corporal punishment. Continue reading

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NBC News Make the Case: Corporal Punishment

Holden, corporal punishment, Meet the Press, SMU, spankingSMU Psychology Professor George W. Holden, psychology, and Michael Farris, president of ParentalRights.Org, debated opposite sides of the controversial question “Should parents be allowed to practice corporal punishment?”

The debate aired Sept. 25 on NBC’s Meet the Press: Make the Case. Continue reading

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The Week: Christians have no moral rationale for spanking their children

corporal punishment, Bible, George Holden, SMU, spanking, The Week, Journalist Jonathan Merritt with high-profile online magazine The Week cited the research findings of SMU psychologist George W. Holden about the controversial practice of corporal punishment.

Merritt’s article, “Christians have no moral rationale for spanking their children,” published Sept. 23. Continue reading

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Dallas Observer: The DeSoto School District Paddled Students 227 Times Last Year, but Won’t Say How or Why

corporal punishment, Dallas Observer, George Holden, SMU, spanking, DeSoto, DISDUnfair Park journalist Emily Mathis with the Dallas Observer interviewed SMU psychologist George W. Holden about the controversial practice of corporal punishment in the context of the Adrian Peterson case.

Mathis’ story, “The DeSoto School District Paddled Students 227 Times Last Year, but Won’t Say How or Why,” published Sept. 17.
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