CBS News: The “spanking” debate — views depend on what you call it

SMU Department of Psychology

CBS News: The “spanking” debate — views depend on what you call it

CBS News covered the research of SMU Psychology Professor George W. Holden, co-author on a study that found corporal punishment is viewed as more acceptable and effective when it's referred to as spanking.

CW33: Spanking Sounds OK, Hitting Not So Much, SMU Study Says

Television station CW33 quoted SMU Psychology Professor Alan S. Brown for his latest research finding corporal punishment is viewed as more acceptable and effective when it's referred to as spanking.

Real Simple: This Is the Best Time of Day to See Your Therapist

If you’re struggling to overcome anxiety or a phobia, you’ll want to schedule a session at this time. Real Simple health writer Amanda MacMillan covered the research of SMU clinical psychologist Alicia Meuret in the latest issue of the magazine and web site. The article, "This Is the Best Time of Day to See Your [...]

Psychotherapy sessions are best in the morning when levels of helpful hormone are high

Patients make more progress toward overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when their therapy sessions are scheduled in the morning, new research suggests. An SMU study found that morning sessions helped psychotherapy patients overcome their panic and anxiety and phobic avoidance better, in part, because levels of cortisol — a naturally occurring hormone — are at their highest then, said clinical psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

New York Daily News: Shocking viral video of 5-year-old boy being paddled

The New York Daily News quoted SMU Psychology Professor George W. Holden, psychology, for his expertise on spanking in an article about a Georgia principal paddling a 5-year-old boy as punishment. The paddling was caught on video and went viral on the Internet by viewers who were horrified and shocked. The article, "Shocking viral video of 5-year-old boy being paddled shines light on legal but 'damaging' corporal punishment," published April 15, 2016.

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

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