Wall Street Journal: For better talk therapy, try taking a nap

SMU Department of Psychology

Real Simple: This Is the Best Time of Day to See Your Therapist

If you’re struggling to overcome anxiety or a phobia, you’ll want to schedule a session at this time. Real Simple health writer Amanda MacMillan covered the research of SMU clinical psychologist Alicia Meuret in the latest issue of the magazine and web site. The article, "This Is the Best Time of Day to See Your [...]

Psychotherapy sessions are best in the morning when levels of helpful hormone are high

Patients make more progress toward overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when their therapy sessions are scheduled in the morning, new research suggests. An SMU study found that morning sessions helped psychotherapy patients overcome their panic and anxiety and phobic avoidance better, in part, because levels of cortisol — a naturally occurring hormone — are at their highest then, said clinical psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

New York Daily News: Shocking viral video of 5-year-old boy being paddled

The New York Daily News quoted SMU Psychology Professor George W. Holden, psychology, for his expertise on spanking in an article about a Georgia principal paddling a 5-year-old boy as punishment. The paddling was caught on video and went viral on the Internet by viewers who were horrified and shocked. The article, "Shocking viral video of 5-year-old boy being paddled shines light on legal but 'damaging' corporal punishment," published April 15, 2016.

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

$2 million NIH grant to help team from SMU and U-Maryland develop pediatric asthma monitor

Two SMU psychology professors working with University of Maryland engineers have been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant that will bring nearly $2 million to their joint project to create a wearable device for pediatric asthma patients that helps them avoid asthma triggers. The asthma device will monitor air quality, carbon dioxide levels in the blood, physical activity and other stimuli to identify triggers and alert a patient when conditions are ripe for an attack.

Daily Mail: Fretting over your weight? You may be ready for a baby

Meltzer, peak fertility, weight gain, SMULondon's Daily Mail newspaper reported on the research of SMU social psychologist Andrea L. Meltzer, who was lead author on three independent studies that found biology isn’t the only reason women eat less as they near ovulation, a time when they are at their peak fertility. The studies found that another part of the equation is a woman’s desire to maintain her body’s attractiveness, says Meltzer.

At peak fertility, women who desire to maintain body attractiveness report they eat less

SMU, Meltzer, ovulation, weight loss, women, attractivenessBiology isn’t the only reason women eat less as they near ovulation, a time when they are at their peak fertility. Three new independent studies found that another part of the equation is a woman’s desire to maintain her body’s attractiveness, says social psychologist and assistant professor Andrea L. Meltzer, Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

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