SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU Department of Physics

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

Fermilab experiment observes change in neutrinos from one type to another over 500 miles

Nova, neutrinos, Fermilab, SMU, CoanInitial data from a new U.S.–based physics experiment indicates scientists are a step closer to understanding neutrinos, the second most abundant particle in the universe, says SMU physics professor Thomas Coan, a principal investigator on the project.

2017-07-20T16:47:52+00:00 August 7, 2015|Categories: Earth & Climate, Energy & Matter, Videos|Tags: , , |

1st proton collisions at the world’s largest science experiment expected to start the first or second week of June

Dallas Hall w scatterThe schedule announcement came during an international physics conference on the SMU campus from senior research scientist Albert De Roeck, a staff member at CERN and a leading scientist on one of the Large Hadron Collider's key experiments in Geneva. “It will be about another six weeks to commission the machine, and many things can still happen on the way,” said De Roeck. The LHC in early April was restarted for its second three-year run after a two-year pause to upgrade the machine to operate at higher energies. At higher energy, physicists worldwide expect to see new discoveries about the laws that govern our natural universe.

Physicists tune Large Hadron Collider to find “sweet spot” in high-energy proton smasher

New launch of the world's most powerful particle accelerator is the most stringent test yet of our accepted theories of how subatomic particles work and interact

National Public Radio’s Science Friday: Understanding the dark side of physics

dark matter, dark energy, jodi cooley, physics, sum, CDMS, science fridaySMU physicist Jodi Cooley was a guest of National Public Radio's Science Friday show to share in a discussion about what physicists know and don't know about mysterious dark matter. Dark matter is believed to make up the bulk of the matter in the universe. Cooley, an assistant professor in the SMU Department of Physics, is an experimental particle physicist and part of a scientific team searching for dark matter.

Fermilab Symmetry: From the Standard Model to space

Ryan Rios, CERNSymmetry Magazine, the monthly publication of the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, featured SMU physics alum Ryan Rios in an article about physicists working at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Rios was a graduate student in the SMU Department of Physics and as part of a team led by SMU Physics Professor Ryszard Stroynowski spent from 2007 to 2012 as a member of the ATLAS experiment at Switzerland-based CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

FOX 4 DFW: SMU’s supercomputer aids in search for particles present during Big Bang

Thomas Coan, neutrinos, SMUSMU physicist Thomas E. Coan talked with Fox 4 DFW reporter Dan Godwin about the neutrino, an elusive fundamental particle that scientists are working to understand using one of the most powerful physics experiments in the world. Godwin hosted Coan on the program Fox4Ward on Nov. 30, 2014. Coan and Godwin discussed neutrinos, one of the most elusive particles in the Standard Model's "particle zoo."

KERA Think: Tiny Particles, Big Impact

Tom Coan, neutrinos, SMU, physics, NOvAKERA public radio 90.1 hosted SMU physicist Thomas E. Coan on Krys Boyd's "Think" program Oct. 29. Coan and Boyd discussed neutrinos, one of the most elusive particles in the Standard Model's "particle zoo." Neutrinos are the subject of the NOvA experiment, with the goal to better understand the origins of matter and the inner workings of the universe.

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