CTNewsJunkie.com: Ignoring Science At Our Own Peril

SMU Department of Physics

CTNewsJunkie.com: Ignoring Science At Our Own Peril

"A scientific theory is a very well-tested explanation, built from facts, confirmed hypotheses, and inferences." — SMU physicist Stephen Sekula An Op-Ed in the online Connecticut news outlet CTNewsJunkie.com tapped the expertise of SMU Associate Professor of Physics Stephen Sekula. The writer of the piece, High School English teacher Barth Keck at Haddam-Killingworth High School, [...]

SMU Research Day 2017 visitors query SMU students on the details of their research

The best in SMU undergraduate and graduate research work was on full display at Research Day in the Hughes Trigg Student Center.

KDFW Fox 4: NASA discovers seven earth-like planets relatively near

DFW Fox 4 TV reporter Steve Eagar expressed "nerd-level" excitement about NASA's announcement Feb. 22 of the discovery of seven new Earth-like planets. Eagar interviewed SMU professor Robert Kehoe, who leads the SMU astronomy team from the Department of Physics.

APS Physics: Viewpoint — Dark Matter Still at Large

SMU physicist Jodi Cooley, an associate professor in the Department of Physics, writes in the latest issue of Physical Review Letters about hunt by physicists worldwide for dark matter — the most elusive and abundant matter in our Universe.

SMU physicists: CERN’s Large Hadron Collider is once again smashing protons, taking data

CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments are back in action, now taking physics data for 2016 to get an improved understanding of fundamental physics.

Nearby massive star explosion 30 million years ago equaled brightness of 100 million suns

A giant star that exploded 30 million years ago in a galaxy near Earth had a radius prior to going supernova that was 200 times larger than our sun, say astrophysicists at SMU. The massive explosion, Supernova 2013j, was one of the closest to Earth in recent years. Analysis of the exploding star's light curve and color spectrum found its sudden blast hurled material from it at 10,000 kilometers a second.

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

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