Russia awards SMU’s Weber $3 million for research lab to study diversity, social interactions

SMU Department of Economics

Russia awards SMU’s Weber $3 million for research lab to study diversity, social interactions

Russian boys in snow 400x300 A $3 million grant to SMU economics professor Shlomo Weber will fund the establishment of a first-of-its-kind research laboratory to study diversity and social interactions. The new center at Moscow’s New Economic School will focus on research into societal diversity, ranging from economic, historical and geographical to linguistic and ethnic. Researchers at the center will assess the impact of diversity on economic, political and social development, said Weber, a professor in the SMU Department of Economics.

SMU-North Texas Food Bank study will analyze causes of hunger in Dallas and rural North Texas

Economists at SMU will analyze the roles social networks and isolation play in fighting hunger in North Texas. Recent studies have found that household economic resources are not the only factor contributing to food insecurity, according to Thomas B. Fomby, SMU professor of economics.

Despite belief WIC improves infant health, new study finds no positive or negative impact

Existing scientific literature suggests the U.S. government nutritional program known as WIC improves birth outcomes of children, but new SMU research is unable to find either a positive or negative impact on infant health. WIC, which serves 53 percent of all U.S. infants, is for low-income pregnant women and their young children under five who are at or below 185 percent of the federal poverty level.

Imposing trade restrictions on parallel imports can motivate a firm to export, study finds

Imposing trade restrictions on parallel imports has the surprising effect of motivating a firm to export, according to a new study using game theory economic analysis, says co-author Santanu Roy, SMU. The study found that diverse parallel importing policies make it possible to analyze for the first time how competition between firms and allowing or banning parallel imports can influence competition.

UPI: Study looks at how language excludes many in EU

UPI and other media outlets have covered the research of SMU economist Shlomo Weber. In the new book "How Many Languages Do We Need? The Economics of Linguistic Diversity" (Princeton University Press), Weber and his co-author, Victor Ginsburgh, researched the costs and benefits of the many languages across the globe.

Vast majority of European Union citizens are marginalized by dominance of English language

A new study finds nearly two-thirds of the European Union’s 500 million people are linguistically disenfranchised because they don’t speak English, which is the EU’s most dominant official language. History has shown that political regimes mandate single languages for efficiency or social control. But limiting linguistic diversity can backfire, says economist Shlomo Weber, Southern Methodist University.

International Monetary Fund: A review of “How Many Languages Do We Need?”

Renowned non-fiction author Henry Hitchings covers SMU economist Shlomo Weber's new book "How Many Languages Do We Need? The Economics of Linguistic Diversity" (Princeton University Press). Writing for the International Monetary Fund, Hitchings' review "Speaking in Tongues" notes that Weber and his co-author, Victor Ginsburgh, have scrupulously researched the costs and benefits of the many languages across the globe. Hitchings, the author of "The Language Wars" and "The Secret Life of Words" among other books, notes that the books most thought-provoking section is the case study of linguistic policy in the European Union.

UPI: Infants: Public insurance better, cheaper

The news wire service United Press International has covered the research of SMU economist Manan Roy, a doctoral candidate and adjunct professor in the SMU Department of Economics. Roy analyzed new federal data about insured infants to compare public health insurance with private health insurance. Her analysis found that among the insured, infants in low-income families are better off under the nation’s government-funded public health insurance than infants covered by private insurance.

Public health insurance provides insured infants better, less costly care than private plans

In the fierce national debate over a new federal law that requires all Americans to have health insurance, it’s widely assumed that private health insurance can do a better job than public insurance. But a first-of-its-kind study of newly available government data found just the opposite for infants covered by insurance, says economist Manan Roy in SMU's Department of Economics.

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