SMU Department of Anthropology

Live Science: Archaeologist Recreates Stone Age Technology

flintknapper-eren-101112-02.jpgLive Science is featuring an interview with Metin I. Eren, a Ph.D. candidate in the SMU Department of Anthropology.

In the November 12 piece, “Science Lives: Archaeologist Recreates Stone Age Technology,” Eren answers the ScienceLives 10 Questions to elaborate on his expertise in Stone Age archaeology, human evolution and experimental archaeology.

An expert flintknapper, Eren can accurately replicate prehistoric stone-tool technology to investigate prehistoric tool efficiency, design and production.
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Scientists issue call to action for archaeological sites threatened by rising seas, urban development

Western%20Site%20Margin%20400x300.jpgShould global warming cause sea levels to rise as predicted in coming decades, thousands of archaeological sites in coastal areas around the world will be lost to erosion.

With no hope of saving all these sites, an SMU archaeologist and others call for scientists to assess the sites most at risk.

Photo: A site at Anacapa Island, southern California, is in danger of eroding into the ocean. (Credit: Reeder)
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The Washington Post: Evidence increases that Neanderthals more closely linked to humans

The Washington Post has noted the Neanderthal research of SMU archaeology graduate student Metin I. Eren in a new article “Neanderthals reimagined” that looks out the changing scientific interpretation of humans ancestors.

Reporter Marc Kaufman in the Oct. 5 article Neanderthals reimagined cites Eren’s 2007 research as some of the scientific evidence showing Neanderthals were smarter than once thought, and more like sisters and brothers to modern humans, rather than cousins, as previously perceived.

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USA Today: Researchers — Clovis people didn’t disappear because of comet

BwD%20Clovis%20type%20specimens%20II%20150x120px.jpgUSA Today has written about the research of SMU archaeologist David Meltzer that challenges the controversial theory that an ancient comet devastated the Clovis people, one of the earliest known cultures in North America.

Writing online in USA Today’s Science Fair section, journalist Elizabeth Weise notes that Meltzer demonstrates in a recent study that there is nothing in the archaeological record to suggest an abrupt collapse of Clovis populations.
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Natl Geographic: Trampling Skews Artifact Dates by Thousands of Years?

Measuring%2C%20Jurreru%20Valley%2C%20India%20150x120.jpgNational Geographic online features the archaeology research of SMU graduate student Metin I. Eren.

In the September 29 story, “Trampling Skews Artifact Dates by Thousands of Years? Animals push human tools into ground — and back in time, study says,” journalist Ker Than writes about Eren’s research in India, which found that animals trampling wet ground can alter how a scientist interprets an archaeological site. Continue reading

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No evidence for ancient comet devastating Clovis, says SMU archaeologist’s research

New research challenges the controversial theory that an ancient comet devastated the Clovis people, one of the earliest known cultures in North America.

In the October issue of Current Anthropology, SMU archaeologist David Meltzer demonstrates there is nothing in the archaeological record to suggest an abrupt collapse of Clovis populations.
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New York Times: Who Gets To Be An American?

the%20flag%20350x96.jpgArizona is grabbing headlines with its new law making it a crime if immigrants don’t carry documents showing they are legal. While the new law has sparked boycotts of the state, it also has found support among whites in many cities and towns across the United States.

The backlash isn’t just about race alone, however, say anthropologists Caroline B. Brettell and Faith G. Nibbs at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Continue reading

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Taking a new look at old digs: Trampling animals can alter muddy Paleolithic sites

Stone Age tools embedded in the ground can mislead archaeologists about a Prehistoric site’s age by several thousand years, says SMU archaeologist Metin I. Eren.

New research findings show that animals trampling across muddy ground significantly disturbed stone tools at a watery archaeological site fabricated for the study. The findings suggest archaeologists should reanalyze some previous discoveries.
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The Taos News: Ft. Burgwin founder, SMU’s Fred Wendorf, leads off lecture series

Fred%20Wendorf.jpgThe work of SMU archaeologist Fred Wendorf was featured in the Sept. 8, 2010, edition of The Taos News. Fred Wendorf is Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at SMU and the author of Desert Days: My Life as a Field Archaeologist, as well as more than 30 other books. In 1987, he became the first SMU faculty member elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

The article “Dr. Fred Wendorf leads off UNM-Taos/SMU lecture series” retells Wendorf’s contribution to preserving the history of Ft. Burgwin.
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