The making of Maori society: An archaeological analysis of social networks

SMU Department of Anthropology

Daily Mail: The first king — 1200 AD tomb reveals ancient city invented new kind of society

They used an X-ray gun ... and dates were calculated based on the characteristics of the radioactive isotope thorium-230 and its radioactive parent uranium-234. Science journalist Cheyenne MacDonald covered the research discovery of SMU archaeologist Mark D. McCoy. New dating on the stone buildings of the ancient monumental city of Nan Madol suggests the ancient [...]

Fox News: Mysterious Pacific island burial site is older than thought, study says

"Nan Madol represents a first in Pacific Island history. The tomb of the first chiefs of Pohnpei is a century older than similar monumental burials of leaders on other islands." — Mark McCoy, SMU Science reporter Rob Verger covered the research discovery that new dating on the stone buildings of the ancient monumental city of [...]

Evidence of first chief indicates Pacific islanders invented a new society on city they built of coral and basalt

SMU archaeologist Mark McCoy's new analysis of the chief’s tomb of Nan Madol suggests the island’s monumental structures are the earliest evidence of a chiefdom in the Pacific — yielding new keys to how societies emerge and evolve

Polity Immigration and Society Series: Gender and Migration

"Gender and Migration" is encyclopedic in nature and an essential resource for anyone interested in immigration, gender or both. — Nancy Foner, Hunter College Gender roles, relations, and ideologies are major aspects of migration. In a timely book on the subject, SMU anthropologist Caroline B. Brettell argues that understanding gender relations is vital to a [...]

Textbook theory of how humans populated America is “biologically unviable,” study finds

The established theory of how Ice Age peoples first reached the present-day United States is now challenged by an unprecedented study that concludes that entry route was “biologically unviable.” The North American ice-free corridor, thought to have been used by the first colonizers, only became biologically viable 12,600 years ago — after they would have arrived. Researchers suggest a Pacific coast was the entry route.

Wildfire on warming planet requires adaptive capacity at local, national, int’l scales

Industrialized nations that view wildfire as the enemy have much to learn from people in some parts of the world who have learned to live compatibly with wildfire, says a team of fire research scientists. The interdisciplinary team say there is much to be learned from these “fire-adaptive communities” and they are calling on policy makers to tap that knowledge, particularly in the wake of global warming.

Long-term daily contact with Spanish missions triggered collapse of Native American populations in New Mexico

New research in the Southwest U.S. has resolved long-standing debates on the timing and magnitude of American Indian population collapse in the region. The severe and rapid collapse of Native American populations in what is now New Mexico didn’t happen upon first contact with Spanish conquistadors in the 1500s. Nor was it as gradual as others had contended.

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

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