Simmons School of Education & Human Development

How much energy does it take to walk? New equation is first to calculate cost of walking

Family%20walking%20400x300.jpgAny parent that takes their kid out for a walk knows that children tire more quickly than adults, but why is that?

A study by SMU’s Peter Weyand and colleagues found that tall people walk more economically than short or small people because tall people have longer strides and take fewer steps to cover the same distance.

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Scientific American: Who Will Win: A Squirrel, an Elephant, a Pig or a Safety?

football-NBC%20Learn.jpgA Nov. 11 article in Scientific American cites the expert analysis of SMU physiologist and biomechanist Peter Weyand as part of an effort to explore the physics of speed and acceleration.

In a special partnership with NBC Learn, the science magazine set up an imaginary 40-yard dash with the video series, “The Science of NFL Football.” Weyand was posed the question: Imagine a 40-yard dash that races a wide receiver, a safety, an ostrich, an elephant and a pig — who would win? Read the excerpt for Weyand’s answer.
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Popular Mechanics: The Animal Kingdom’s Top Marathoners

sleddogs-300-md.jpgAn article looking at the abilities of humans and animals to run long distances tapped into the research of SMU physiologist and biomechanist Peter Weyand.

Journalist Brian Resnick in Popular Mechanics cites Weyand’s knowledge to explain the differences at work between humans and animals in “The Animal Kingdom’s Top Marathoners.” Weyand is an SMU associate professor of applied physiology and biomechanics in the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education & Human Development.
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Human running speed of 35-40 mph may be biologically possible

Usain_Bolt_16082009_Berlin%2Csmall.jpgJamaican sprinter Usain Bolt‘s record-setting performances have unleashed a wave of interest in the ultimate limits to human running speed. A new study published Jan. 21 in the Journal of Applied Physiology offers intriguing insights into the biology and perhaps even the future of human running speed.

The newly published evidence identifies the critical variable imposing the biological limit to running speed, and offers an enticing view of how the biological limits might be pushed back beyond the nearly 28 miles per hour speeds achieved by Bolt to speeds of perhaps 35 or even 40 miles per hour.

The new paper, “The biological limits to running speed are imposed from the ground up,” was authored by Peter Weyand of Southern Methodist University; Rosalind Sandell and Danille Prime, both formerly of Rice University; and Matthew Bundle of the University of Wyoming.
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Researchers: Pistorius’ artificial limbs give him clear, major advantage

Oscar%20Pistorius%2CbyJeffFitlowcropped.jpgThe artificial lower limbs of double-amputee Olympic hopeful Oscar Pistorius give him a clear and major advantage over his competition, taking 10 seconds or more off what his 400-meter race time would be if his prosthesis behaved like intact limbs.

That’s the conclusion — released to the public for the first time — of human performance experts Peter Weyand of Southern Methodist University and Matthew Bundle of the University of Wyoming.

The Weyand-Bundle conclusion is part of a written Point-Counterpoint style debate published online Nov. 19 in the “Journal of Applied Physiology.”

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