HuffPo: Cheating in Sports — Where Do We Go From Here?

Simmons School of Education & Human Development

HuffPo: Cheating in Sports — Where Do We Go From Here?

2015-09-13-1442168688-1501438-HuffPoFairnessFinalpic-thumbSMU physiologist and biomechanics researcher Peter G. Weyand contributed a piece on cheating in sports to the U.S. online news magazine and blog the Huffington Post. The piece addresses how modern cheating controversies in sports indicate the need for a new approach to judge fairness that encompasses a broader range of possibilities.

Wall Street Journal: March’s True Madness — Flopping

Peter Weyand, flopping, Mark Cuban, NCAAAs the 2015 NCAA tournament gets into gear, Wall Street Journal sports reporter Brian Costa quoted SMU locomotor expert Peter Weyand for an article on flopping among college basketball athletes. The article, "March's True Madness: Flopping," quotes Weyand and other experts on the prevalence of flopping in college basketball and the ability of referees to detect it.

The New York Times: The Fast Life of Oscar Pistorius

The New York Times has written a comprehensive piece on the long-running global controversy surrounding double-amputee runner Oscar Pistorius, the South African vying to compete in the Olympics. The Jan. 18 article, "The Fast Life of Oscar Pistorius," cites extensively the work of SMU's Peter Weyand, an expert in human locomotion.

Science of Sport: Oscar Pistorius’ controversy continues to bubble

482594-oscar-pistorius.jpgThe popular blog The Science of Sport has posted a year-end piece on the long-running global controversy surrounding double-amputee runner Oscar Pistorius, the South African vying to compete in the Olympics. The blog article cites extensively the work of SMU's Peter Weyand, an expert in human locomotion.

The Telegraph: The Pistorius problem – how South African blade runner’s artificial legs make him 10 seconds quicker

482594-oscar-pistorius.jpgAustralia's The Telegraph newspaper quotes SMU's Peter Weyand, an expert in human locomotion, in an Aug. 11 article "The Pistorius problem - how South African blade runner's artificial legs make him 10 seconds quicker"

The Telegraph article examines the controversy surrounding double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius and his qualification for the 2012 London Olympics. What if the 24-year-old South African — the world's only sprinter with no legs — comes out a winner? Will their be an outcry against Pistorius controversial carbon-fiber prosthetic legs that attach just below his knees?

National Post: Five things: The trials and tribulations of Oscar ‘Blade Runner’ Pistorius

0808pistorius.jpgCanada's National Post newspaper quotes SMU's Peter Weyand, an expert in human locomotion, in an Aug. 8 article "Five things: The trials and tribulations of Oscar 'Blade Runner' Pistorius"

The Post article examines the controversy surrounding double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius. Preparing now for the 2012 London Olympics, the 24-year-old South African once again is under the spotlight for his controversial carbon-fiber prosthetic legs that attach just below his knees.

New York Times: As Debate Goes On, Amputee Will Break Barrier

TRACK1-articleInline.jpgThe New York Times tapped the expertise of SMU's Peter Weyand, an expert in human locomotion, in an Aug. 8 article "As Debate Goes On, Amputee Will Break Barrier"

Journalist Juliet Macur examines the controversy surrounding double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius. Preparing now for the 2012 London Olympics, the 24-year-old South African once again is under the spotlight for his controversial carbon-fiber prosthetic legs that attach just below his knees.

ESPN: The Olympics loom for Oscar Pistorius

espn_g_pistoriuso2_576.jpgSports journalist Johnette Howard quotes SMU's Peter Weyand, an expert in human locomotion, in an Aug. 5 article "The Olympics loom for Oscar Pistorius"

Howard examines the accomplishments of double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius and the controversy that has dogged his racing career. Preparing now for the 2012 London Olympics, the 24-year-old South African once again is under the spotlight for his controversial carbon-fiber prosthetic legs that attach just below his knees.

ESPN Grantland: Is the Fastest Human Ever Already Alive?

grantland_g_bolt01_576.jpgSports journalist Chuck Klosterman quotes SMU's Peter Weyand, an expert in human locomotion, in the July 12 ESPN Grantland article, "Is the Fastest Human Ever Already Alive?"

Klosterman looks at the evolution of track's 100-meter dash and runners' repeated shattering of the world record for the race. In discussing the mechanics of human speed, he quotes Weyand on how it relates to a runner's physiology and the force sprinter's apply to the ground.

Weyand, who is widely quoted in the press for his expertise on human speed, is an SMU associate professor of applied physiology and biomechanics in the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education & Human Development.

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