Daily Mail: Earth’s moon threw a ‘wobbly’ after it formed: Lunar poles wandered 125 MILES as volcanic bubbles threw them off balance

Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences

Daily Mail: Earth’s moon threw a ‘wobbly’ after it formed: Lunar poles wandered 125 MILES as volcanic bubbles threw them off balance

327EC6E200000578-3506346-Scientists_say_they_have_discovered_evidence_that_the_Moon_s_axi-a-3_1458751653451Science reporter Richard Gray with The Daily Mail covered the research of SMU planetary scientist and research assistant professor Matthew Siegler and a team of scientists who discovered the moon wandered off its axis billions of years ago due to a shift in its mass most likely caused by volcanic activity. The article, "Earth's moon threw a 'wobbly' after it formed: Lunar poles wandered 125 MILES as volcanic bubbles threw them off balance," published March 23.

Wired: The Moon used to spin on a different axis

1-nasadataleadWired reporter Emily Reynolds covered the research of SMU planetary scientist and research assistant professor Matthew Siegler and a team of scientists who discovered the moon wandered off its axis billions of years ago due to a shift in its mass most likely caused by volcanic activity. The article, "The Moon used to spin on a different axis," published March 24. A report on the discovery of the rare event was published today in Nature.

Agence France-Presse in The Japan Times, Raw Story: Moon’s ‘wandering poles’ shifted long ago: study

moonpoles-afp-800x430Agence France-Presse covered the research of SMU planetary scientist and research assistant professor Matthew Siegler and a team of scientists who discovered the moon wandered off its axis billions of years ago due to a shift in its mass most likely caused by volcanic activity. The article, "Moon’s ‘wandering poles’ shifted long ago: study," published March 24. A report on the discovery of the rare event was published today in Nature: that Earth’s moon slowly moved from its original axis roughly 3 billion years ago.

Smithsonian: Ancient Volcanoes May Have Shifted the Moon’s Poles

moon_poles_shift.jpg__800x450_q85_crop_upscaleScience reporter Danny Lewis with Smithsonian covered the research of SMU planetary scientist and research assistant professor Matthew Siegler and a team of scientists who discovered the moon wandered off its axis billions of years ago due to a shift in its mass most likely caused by volcanic activity. The article, "Ancient Volcanoes May Have Shifted the Moon’s Poles," published March 24. A report on the discovery of the rare event was published today in Nature: that Earth’s moon slowly moved from its original axis roughly 3 billion years ago.

NASA data leads to rare discovery: Earth’s moon wandered off axis billions of years ago

Ancient lunar ice indicates the moon’s axis slowly shifted by 125 miles, or 6 degrees, over 1 billion years. Earth’s moon is now a member of solar system’s exclusive “true polar wander” club, which includes just a handful of other planetary bodies. Planetary scientist Matt Siegler at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and colleagues made the discovery while examining NASA data known to indicate lunar polar hydrogen.

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

Science Insider: Does North Korea really have an H-bomb?

Stump, North Korea, H-bomb, earthquakeScience Insider, the online news site for the American Association for the Advancement of Science, quoted SMU seismologist Brian Stump, saying seismic data confirms that an earthquake in North Korea was triggered by an explosion there Jan. 5. Richard Stone, who covers international news for Science quoted Stump in the Jan. 6 article, "Does North Korea really have an H-bomb?"

Live Science: The 10 Strangest Animal Discoveries of 2015

Desmo, Ray Troll, Louis Jacobs, SMU, AlaskaScience writer Laura Geggel with Live Science named a new species of extinct marine mammal identified by two SMU paleontologists among "The 10 Strangest Animal Discoveries of 2015." The new species was identified by SMU paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs, a professor in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, and paleontologist and SMU adjunct research professor Anthony Fiorillo, vice president of research and collections and chief curator at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science.

Dallas Morning News: Mounting evidence suggests Dallas quakes are induced by human activity

SMU seismologists presented new earthquake findings at the American Geophysical Union annual meeting. (Credit: DMN) Science journalist Anna Kuchment with The Dallas Morning News covered the comments of SMU seismologists Heather DeShon and Beatrice Magnani speaking during the annual American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco, Calif. DeShon and Magnani presented their latest research on North Texas ground shaking.

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