Pia Vogel

EARTH: Long-Lost Letters Shed New Light on 19th-Century Bone Wars

Science journalist David B. Williams, who writes for Earth magazine, covered the research of SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs and the infamous Bone Wars of the late 1800s.

The article, “Long-Lost Letters Shed New Light on 19th-Century Bone Wars,” was published in the January 2013 issue of Earth. Continue reading

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Discover blog “80 beats”: Newly Unearthed Papers From Fossil Hunters Include An Ode to Bones

The science magazine Discover has covered the research of SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs and the infamous Bone Wars of the late 1800s.

In a post on Discover’s “80 beats” blog, the magazine reprinted the translation of a poem written by frontier naturalist and fossil hunter Jacob Boll. Jacobs came across the poem at the American Museum of Natural History on a label on the back of Eryops specimen No. AMNH 4183. Continue reading

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Wired: Bone Wars — The Texas Connection

Science journalist Brian Switek, who blogs for Wired magazine, covered the research of SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs and the infamous Bone Wars of the late 1800s. Continue reading

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Frontburner: Texas’ Bone Wars Studied by SMU Professor

Jason Heid, an editor with D Magazine’s popular Frontburner blog, covered the research of SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs and the infamous Bone Wars of the late 1800s.

The Bone Wars refers to a flurry of fossil speculation across the American West escalated into a high-profile national feud. Drawn into the spectacle were two scientists from the Lone Star State, geologist Robert T. Hill, now acclaimed as the Father of Texas Geology, and naturalist Jacob Boll, who made many of the state’s earliest fossil discoveries. Continue reading

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Texas frontier scientists who uncovered state’s fossil history had role in epic Bone Wars

In the late 1800s, furious fossil speculation across the American West escalated into a high-profile national feud called the Bone Wars. Vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs unveils how the Bone Wars touched Texas through the lives of two Lone Star scientists, geologist Robert T. Hill and naturalist Jacob Boll. Continue reading

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Moving 3D computer model of key human protein is powerful new tool in fight against cancer

A picture is worth 1,000 words when it comes to understanding how things work, but 3D moving pictures are even better. That’s true for scientists trying to stop cancer by better understanding the proteins that make some chemotherapies unsuccessful. Now SMU biochemist John G. Wise at SMU has brought to life in a moving 3D computer model the structure of a key protein related to recurring cancers. Continue reading

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Modeling the human protein in search of cancer treatment: An SMU Researcher Q&A

SMU biologists Pia Vogel and John Wise in the SMU Department of Biological Sciences are using the computational power of the SMU high-performance supercomputer to screen millions of drug compounds.

They hope to find a compound that can be developed into a drug that re-enables chemotherapy after it fails to work against recurring cancer. Continue reading

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Aids, cancer targeted by biology researchers

Harrod%2CRobert%20lab2.jpgIn his third-floor laboratory in Dedman Life Sciences Building, biologist Robert Harrod and his team are zeroing in on a new way to inhibit the virus that causes AIDS. They already have shown that their approach, which involves the rare genetic disorder Werner syndrome, works when the disorder’s enzyme defect is introduced into cells.

Now they are trying to find practical ways to use this pathway to inhibit the AIDS virus. The beauty of this approach is that the AIDS virus will not be able to mutate in a way that can defeat this treatment, says Harrod, associate professor in the Biological Sciences Department of Dedman College.

Continue reading

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