SMU biochemists, students probe membrane proteins that thwart cancer chemotherapies

Pia Vogel

SMU biochemists, students probe membrane proteins that thwart cancer chemotherapies

Each semester, SMU biology professors Pia Vogel and John Wise welcome a handful of dedicated and curious students to their lab in the SMU Dedman Life Sciences building. The SMU undergraduate students and Dallas-area high school students get hands-on experience working on cancer research in the combined SMU Department of Biological Sciences laboratories of Wise and Vogel.

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

Drugs behave as predicted in computer model of key protein, enabling cancer drug discovery

Wise, P-gp, P-glycoprotein, SMUDrugs important in the battle against cancer responded the way they do in real life and behaved according to predictions when tested in a computer-generated model of one of the cell’s key molecular pumps — the protein P-glycoprotein, or P-gp. Biologists at SMU developed the computer generated model to overcome the problem of relying on only static images for P-gp's structure, said biologist John G. Wise, lead researcher.

Researchers discover new drug-like compounds that may improve odds for men battling prostate cancer

P-gp, P-glycoprotein, prostate, cancer, SMU, VogelResearchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, have discovered three new drug-like compounds that could ultimately offer better odds of survival to prostate cancer patients. The drug-like compounds can be modified and developed into medicines that target a protein in the human body that is responsible for chemotherapy resistance in cancers, said biochemist Pia D. Vogel.

The power of ManeFrame: SMU’s new supercomputer boosts research capacity

SMU now has a powerful new tool for research – one of the fastest academic supercomputers in the nation – and a new facility to house it. With a cluster of more than 1,000 Dell servers, the system’s capacity is on par with high-performance computing (HPC) power at much larger universities and at government-owned laboratories. The U.S. Department of Defense awarded the system to SMU in August 2013.

EARTH: Long-Lost Letters Shed New Light on 19th-Century Bone Wars

Science journalist David B. Williams, who writes for Earth magazine, covered the research of SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs and the infamous Bone Wars of the late 1800s. The article, "Long-Lost Letters Shed New Light on 19th-Century Bone Wars," was published in the January 2013 issue of Earth.

Discover blog “80 beats”: Newly Unearthed Papers From Fossil Hunters Include An Ode to Bones

The science magazine Discover has covered the research of SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs and the infamous Bone Wars of the late 1800s. In a post on Discover's "80 beats" blog, the magazine reprinted the translation of a poem written by frontier naturalist and fossil hunter Jacob Boll. Jacobs came across the poem at the American Museum of Natural History on a label on the back of Eryops specimen No. AMNH 4183.

Wired: Bone Wars — The Texas Connection

Science journalist Brian Switek, who blogs for Wired magazine, covered the research of SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs and the infamous Bone Wars of the late 1800s.

Frontburner: Texas’ Bone Wars Studied by SMU Professor

Jason Heid, an editor with D Magazine's popular Frontburner blog, covered the research of SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs and the infamous Bone Wars of the late 1800s. The Bone Wars refers to a flurry of fossil speculation across the American West escalated into a high-profile national feud. Drawn into the spectacle were two scientists from the Lone Star State, geologist Robert T. Hill, now acclaimed as the Father of Texas Geology, and naturalist Jacob Boll, who made many of the state’s earliest fossil discoveries.

Load More Posts