How Stuff Works: Could Humans Break the Two-hour Marathon Barrier?

Peter Weyand

How Stuff Works: Could Humans Break the Two-hour Marathon Barrier?

How Stuff Works reporter Julia Layton tapped the expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for a news story about the burning question of the limits of human speed and whether — or when — runners will break the two-hour marathon barrier. Weyand explained the biomechanics of human locomotion, particularly as it pertains to fast [...]

KERA News: The Biomechanical Breakdown Of Back Flips On Pogo Sticks

KERA news reporter Courtney Collins tapped the expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for a news story about the extreme pogo stick performers that have captivated fair goers this year at the Texas State Fair. Weyand explained the biomechanics of the high-flying backflips and stunts of the pogo stick gymnasts. The article "The Biomechanical [...]

The Guardian: How fast can we go? The science of the 100m sprint

Weyand, The Guardian, Usain Bolt, human speed, sprint, running, OlympicsJournalist Simon Usborne tapped the human-speed expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the London newspaper The Guardian examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Usborne interviewed Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "How fast can we go? The science of the 100m sprint" published Oct. 3, 2016.

Science.mic: Usain Bolt’s Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science

Journalist Kelly Dickerson referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog Science.Mic examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Dickerson quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Usain Bolt's Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science" published Aug. 15, 2016.

The Globe and Mail: In perfect asymmetry

Journalist Rachel Brady referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "In perfect asymmetry" published Aug. 18, 2016.

The Roar: Humans can’t bolt much faster than Usain — What science says about the 100m world record

Sports writer Matt Porter referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Humans can't bolt much faster than Usain: What science says about the 100m world record" published Aug. 15, 2016.

Inverse: There is no limit to human speed — Fast, faster, fastest, and fastest-er.

Science writer Jacqueline Ronson tapped the expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article on the news web site Inverse.com that examines the possibility for humans to continue running faster and faster — and faster. Ronson cites physiologist Weyand's numerous research findings, which have explored the mechanics of how sprinters like Usain Bolt and other world-class athletes are able to run so fast that they continually break speed records. The article "There is no limit to human speed" published Aug. 11, 2016.

Scientific American: Blade Runners — Do High-Tech Prostheses Give Runners an Unfair Advantage?

Science writer Larry Greenemeier cited the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in Scientific American that examines the pros and cons of carbon-fiber blade prosthetics used by athlete amputees.

Scientific American: Have We Reached the Athletic Limits of the Human Body?

Science writer tapped the expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in Scientific American examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved.

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