SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

Pavel Nadolsky

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

SMU physicists celebrate Nobel Prize for discovery of Higgs boson “god particle”

SMU joins nearly 2,000 physicists from U.S. institutions — including 89 U.S. universities and seven U.S. DOE labs — that participate in discovery experiments Book a live interview To book a live or taped interview with Ryszard Stroynowski in the SMU News Broadcast Studio call SMU News at 214-768-7650 or email news@smu.edu. Related links Science [...]

Observed! SMU’s LHC physicists confirm new particle; Higgs ‘God particle’ opens new frontier of exploration

Physicists from SMU and around the globe were euphoric Wednesday with the historic revelation that a new particle consistent with the Higgs boson “God” particle has been observed. Described as a great triumph for science, the observation is the biggest physics discovery of the last 50 years and opens up what SMU scientists say is a vast new frontier for more research.

SMU physicists at CERN find hints of long sought after Higgs boson — dubbed the fundamental “God” particle

In a giant game of hide and seek, physicists say there are indications they finally may have found evidence of the long sought after fundamental particle called the Higgs boson. Researchers at Switzerland-based CERN, the largest high-energy physics experiment in the world, have been seeking the Higgs boson since it was theorized in the 1960s. The so-called “God” particle is believed to play a fundamental role in solving the important mystery of why matter has mass.

SMU physicist Nadolsky earns DOE Early Career Research Program Award

LHC-Atlas-collision-event.jpgOne of the first LHC collisions at the record energy of 7 trillion electron volts on March 30, 2010. Credit: CERN See a large image of this ATLAS event. Southern Methodist University physicist Pavel Nadolsky will receive $750,000 over five years to fund his work in modeling particle interactions through a new program administered by the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Nadolsky, assistant professor of theoretical physics in the SMU Department of Physics, received the grant for his integrated analysis of particle interactions created by hadron colliders. He was one of 69 researchers chosen through peer review by scientific experts to participate in the DOE's new Early Career Research Program. About 1,750 applicants submitted proposals.

May 12, 2010|Categories: Energy & Matter, Researcher news|Tags: , , |
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