Psychology Today: Empathic People Use Social Brain Circuitry to Process Music

Meadows School of the Arts

Two faculty win NEH fellowships to study music and human brain; quest for Kurdish state

The National Endowment for the Humanities named SMU professors Zachary Wallmark and Sabri Ates as fellowship grant recipients in January — the only two recipients in North Texas for the current funding cycle.

New York Observer: Is Bigger Always More? How U.S. Museums Fared in 2016

The New York Observer newspaper relied on the expertise of Zannie Voss, director of SMU's National Center for Arts Research, for an article on how museums are faring at a time with tighter budgets and less revenue.

Discovery News: Etruscan Inscription Reveals Name of Goddess

Science news site Discovery News covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess.

Daily Mail: Did the Etruscans follow a fertility cult? Inscribed stone slab reveals mysteries of ancient Italian civilisation

Science reporter Richard Gray covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess. The article, "Did the Etruscans follow a fertility cult? Inscribed stone slab reveals mysteries of ancient Italian civilisation," published in the Daily Mail Online Aug. 25.

Live Science: Goddess’s Name Inscribed in Lost Language on Ancient Tablet

Science reporter Stephanie Pappas covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess. The article, "Goddess's Name Inscribed in Lost Language on Ancient Tablet," published Aug. 26.

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