LiveScience: Tough Turtle — Dino-Killing Asteroid Spared Sea Creature

Louis L. Jacobs

Laser Beats Rock: Armored Dinosaur May Have Relied Most on Sense of Smell

Independent science journalist Sarah Puschmann covered the research of SMU Earth Sciences Professor Louis L. Jacobs in a post on her blog "Armored Dinosaur May Have Relied Most on Sense of Smell." A professor in Dedman College's Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Jacobs is co-author of a new analysis of the Cretaceous Period dinosaur Pawpawsaurus based on the first CT scans ever taken of the dinosaur’s skull.

KERA: Thanks To CT Scans, Scientists Know A Lot About Texas’ Pawpawsaurus Dinosaur

"There's no relationship between dinosaurs and armadillos, which are mammals, but it is interesting that something that looked like an armadillo was here in Texas 100 million years before highways." — Jacobs

Dallas Morning News: North Texas dino had tough armor, keen sense of smell

Pawpawsaurus had large nostrils that looked "like a trumpet bell" and wide air passages that helped the 100-million-year-old North Texas dinosaur smell predators, look for food or find mates.

Early armored dino from Texas lacked cousin’s club-tail weapon, but had a nose for danger

First-ever CT scans of the early armored dinosaur Pawpawsaurus campbelli reveal that although the Texas dino lacked its cousin’s club-tail it had a sharp nose for danger. A relative of Ankylosaurus, Pawpawsaurus’s saving grace from predators may have been an acute sense of smell, says SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis Jacobs. Pawpawsaurus lived 100 million years ago, preceding Ankylosaurus by 35 million years.

Live Science: Fearsome Dinosaur-Age ‘Hammerhead’ Reptile Ate … Plants?

Hammerhead reptile, vegetarian, Jacobs, SMU Science journalist Laura Geggel tapped the expertise of SMU Earth Sciences Professor Louis L. Jacobs for a recent article about a prehistoric plant-eating reptile. A professor in Dedman College's Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Jacobs is a world-renowned vertebrate paleontologist. He joined SMU's faculty in 1983 and in 2012 was honored by the 7,200-member Science Teachers Association of Texas with their prestigious Skoog Cup for his significant contributions to advance quality science education.

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

Live Science: The 10 Strangest Animal Discoveries of 2015

Desmo, Ray Troll, Louis Jacobs, SMU, AlaskaScience writer Laura Geggel with Live Science named a new species of extinct marine mammal identified by two SMU paleontologists among "The 10 Strangest Animal Discoveries of 2015." The new species was identified by SMU paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs, a professor in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, and paleontologist and SMU adjunct research professor Anthony Fiorillo, vice president of research and collections and chief curator at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science.

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