Frontburner: Texas’ Bone Wars Studied by SMU Professor

Institute for the Study of Earth and Man

Frontburner: Texas’ Bone Wars Studied by SMU Professor

Jason Heid, an editor with D Magazine's popular Frontburner blog, covered the research of SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs and the infamous Bone Wars of the late 1800s. The Bone Wars refers to a flurry of fossil speculation across the American West escalated into a high-profile national feud. Drawn into the spectacle were two scientists from the Lone Star State, geologist Robert T. Hill, now acclaimed as the Father of Texas Geology, and naturalist Jacob Boll, who made many of the state’s earliest fossil discoveries.

Texas frontier scientists who uncovered state’s fossil history had role in epic Bone Wars

In the late 1800s, furious fossil speculation across the American West escalated into a high-profile national feud called the Bone Wars. Vertebrate paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs unveils how the Bone Wars touched Texas through the lives of two Lone Star scientists, geologist Robert T. Hill and naturalist Jacob Boll.

National Geographic: Texas pterosaur Aetodactylus Halli in the spotlight after 95 million years

Aetodactyls_Halli_SMyers_400px-lowest-rez.jpgNational Geographic News interviewed SMU postdoctoral researcher Timothy S. Myers about the new species and genus of pterosaur he identified and named Aetodactylus Halli. Pterosaurs are a group of flying reptiles commonly referred to as pterodactyls.

In the April 28 article "Toothy Texas Pterosaur Found; Soared Over Dallas" reporter John Roach talked to Myers about the 95 million-year-old jaw that was discovered by Lake Worth resident Lance Hall.

Texas discovery: Rare 95 million-year-old flying reptile Aetodactylus halli is new genus, species of pterosaur

Aetodactyls_Halli_SMyers_400px-lowest-rez.jpgA fossilized jaw discovered at a construction site in Mansfield has been identified and named Aetodactylus halli by SMU paleontologist Timothy S. Myers. Rare in North America, the winged reptile was soaring 95 million years ago over what would one day become Dallas-Fort Worth.

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