Evidence of first chief indicates Pacific islanders invented a new society on city they built of coral and basalt

Dedman College

Evidence of first chief indicates Pacific islanders invented a new society on city they built of coral and basalt

SMU archaeologist Mark McCoy's new analysis of the chief’s tomb of Nan Madol suggests the island’s monumental structures are the earliest evidence of a chiefdom in the Pacific — yielding new keys to how societies emerge and evolve

Polity Immigration and Society Series: Gender and Migration

"Gender and Migration" is encyclopedic in nature and an essential resource for anyone interested in immigration, gender or both. — Nancy Foner, Hunter College Gender roles, relations, and ideologies are major aspects of migration. In a timely book on the subject, SMU anthropologist Caroline B. Brettell argues that understanding gender relations is vital to a [...]

Research: Women hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science

Work life in academia might sound like a dream: summers off, year-long sabbaticals, the opportunity to switch between classroom teaching and research. Yet, when it comes to the sciences, life at the top U.S. research universities is hardly idyllic. Based on surveys of over 2,000 junior and senior scientists, both male and female, as well as in-depth interviews, the new book "Failing Families, Failing Science" by SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln and Rice University sociologist Elaine Howard Ecklund examines how the rigors of a career in academic science makes it especially difficult to balance family and work.

Times Higher Education: How work and family life conflict in the modern university

Academic science still operates on assumptions that have failed to catch up with the realities of today’s family lives, argue scholars Times Higher Education covered the new book of SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln in a Sept. 29 article "How work and family life conflict in the modern university." The book, Failing Families, Failing Science (NYU Press, [...]

Psychotherapy sessions are best in the morning when levels of helpful hormone are high

Patients make more progress toward overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when their therapy sessions are scheduled in the morning, new research suggests. An SMU study found that morning sessions helped psychotherapy patients overcome their panic and anxiety and phobic avoidance better, in part, because levels of cortisol — a naturally occurring hormone — are at their highest then, said clinical psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

NPR: How Domestic Violence In One Home Affects Every Child In A Class

bear-vs-girl1_slide-eec6137db10039983a91f4997472ca67ed44e0c6-s800-c85NPR journalist Gabrielle Emanuel covered the research of SMU government policy expert Elira Kuka for All Things Considered on NPR as part of its series "The Mental Health Crisis In Our Schools." The segment examined the impact on an entire school classroom when one student is victimized by domestic violence at home. Kuka, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics, and her colleagues found that new data shows violence in the home hinders the academic performance not only of the student who is abused, but also of their classmates, too.

SMU biochemists, students probe membrane proteins that thwart cancer chemotherapies

Each semester, SMU biology professors Pia Vogel and John Wise welcome a handful of dedicated and curious students to their lab in the SMU Dedman Life Sciences building. The SMU undergraduate students and Dallas-area high school students get hands-on experience working on cancer research in the combined SMU Department of Biological Sciences laboratories of Wise and Vogel.

Textbook theory of how humans populated America is “biologically unviable,” study finds

The established theory of how Ice Age peoples first reached the present-day United States is now challenged by an unprecedented study that concludes that entry route was “biologically unviable.” The North American ice-free corridor, thought to have been used by the first colonizers, only became biologically viable 12,600 years ago — after they would have arrived. Researchers suggest a Pacific coast was the entry route.

Laser Beats Rock: Armored Dinosaur May Have Relied Most on Sense of Smell

Independent science journalist Sarah Puschmann covered the research of SMU Earth Sciences Professor Louis L. Jacobs in a post on her blog "Armored Dinosaur May Have Relied Most on Sense of Smell." A professor in Dedman College's Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Jacobs is co-author of a new analysis of the Cretaceous Period dinosaur Pawpawsaurus based on the first CT scans ever taken of the dinosaur’s skull.

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