David Rosenfield

UPI: Panic attacks may be predictable

Electrodes%202%20684.jpgThe wire service UPI has covered the research of SMU psychologist Dr. Alicia Meuret showing panic attacks that seem to strike out-of-the-blue are not without warning after all.

Meuret’s study found significant physiological instability one hour before patients reported feeling a panic attack. The findings suggest potentially new treatments for panic, and re-examination of other “unexpected” medical problems, including seizures, strokes and manic episodes, says Meuret, an assistant professor in the SMU Department of Psychology. She was lead researcher on the study. Dr. David Rosenfield, an associate professor in SMU’s Department of Psychology, was lead statistician.

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Out-of-the-blue panic attacks aren’t without warning; data show subtle changes before patients’ aware of attack

Panic attacks that seem to strike out-of-the-blue are not without warning after all, says psychologist Alicia Meuret, Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

A new study found significant physiological instability for at least one hour before patients reported feeling a panic attack, Meuret says, suggesting new treatments for panic, seizures, strokes and manic episodes.
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Cosmopolitan: Feeling stressed and panicked? Don’t take a deep breath!

Meuret%20400x300%2072dpi.jpgA new treatment that helps people with panic disorder normalize their breathing works better to reduce panic symptoms and hyperventilation than traditional cognitive therapy, says SMU psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

Cosmopolitan magazine has taken note of Meuret’s research with a Jan. 3 article that warns readers to forget about taking a deep breath when they’re feeling stressed and hyperventilating — it will only make the problem worse.
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Live Science: Less is more when breathing to relieve panic

Meuret%20400x300%2072dpi.jpgA new treatment that helps people with panic disorder normalize their breathing works better to reduce panic symptoms and hyperventilation than traditional cognitive therapy, says SMU psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

Live Science news site interviewed the SMU psychology department’s Meuret for an article about her research findings that the feeling of suffocation that comes with panic attacks can be alleviated by breathing less — not more. The Dec. 26 article “To Stave Off Panic, Don’t Take a Deep Breath
” tells readers that deep breathing reduces carbon dioxide in the system, which in turn causes symptoms like dizziness and numbness.

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A new breathing therapy reduces panic and anxiety by reversing hyperventilation

Meuret%20400x300%2072dpi.jpgA new treatment that helps people with panic disorder normalize their breathing works better to reduce panic symptoms and hyperventilation than traditional cognitive therapy, says SMU psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

Photo: Dr. Alicia Meuret demonstrates the CART breathing technique. (Credit: Hillsman Jackson)
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UPI: Abusive mothers can improve parenting

MotherDaughter.jpgUPI covered the research of SMU psychologists Ernest Jouriles, Renee McDonald, David Rosenfield and Deborah Corbitt-Shindler in a July 30 story “Abusive mothers can improve parenting.”

The research found that abusive mothers, who are taught parenting skills and given emotional support, can improve their parenting skills, the researchers say. Continue reading

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Abusive mothers improve their parenting after home visits, classes and emotional support from therapists

MotherDaughter.jpg

Each year, U.S. child welfare agencies log more than 3 million reports of child abuse and neglect involving nearly 6 million children.

There are many types of services to address child abuse but very little scientific data about whether the services actually work, according to SMU psychologists Ernest Jouriles and Renee McDonald.

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