Sapiens: Why the Famous Folsom Point Isn’t a Smoking Gun

David Meltzer

A Total Eclipse of the First Day of School

Thousands of students, faculty and townspeople showed up on campus Monday, Aug. 22 to view the Great American Solar Eclipse at a viewing hosted by Dedman College and the SMU Physics Department.

Textbook theory of how humans populated America is “biologically unviable,” study finds

The established theory of how Ice Age peoples first reached the present-day United States is now challenged by an unprecedented study that concludes that entry route was “biologically unviable.” The North American ice-free corridor, thought to have been used by the first colonizers, only became biologically viable 12,600 years ago — after they would have arrived. Researchers suggest a Pacific coast was the entry route.

SMU 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU scientists and their research have a global reach that is frequently noted, beyond peer publications and media mentions. It was a good year for SMU faculty and student research efforts. Here's a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015, ranging from research modeling that made the cover of a scientific journal to research findings presented as evidence at government hearings.

New York Times: Scientists Trace an Ancient DNA Link Between Amazonians and Australasians

New York Times, Meltzer, DNA, genome, migration, first americansNew York Times reporter James Gorman interviewed SMU's David Meltzer, a professor in the SMU Department of Anthropology, about a new large genome-scale study revealing ancestors of Native Americans arrived in the Americas in a single migration wave, no earlier than 23,000 years ago. The finding addresses the ongoing debate over when and how many times the ancestors of present-day Native Americans entered the New World from Siberia.

Los Angeles Times: Native American origins: When the DNA points two ways

la-sci-sn-native-american-origins-dna-20150721-001Los Angeles Times reporter Eryn Brown interviewed SMU's David Meltzer, a professor in the SMU Department of Anthropology, about a new large genome-scale study revealing ancestors of Native Americans arrived in the Americas in a single migration wave, no earlier than 23,000 years ago. The finding addresses the ongoing debate over when and how many times the ancestors of present-day Native Americans entered the New World from Siberia.

Large genome-scale study finds Native American ancestors arrived in single migration wave

Siberia, Meltzer, Paleoamericans, Clovis, first americans, migrationA new large genome-scale study reveals that the ancestors of all present-day Native Americans arrived in the Americas as part of a single migration wave, no earlier than 23,000 ago. The finding addresses the ongoing debate over when and how many times the ancestors of present-day Native Americans entered the New World from Siberia. Archaeological evidence logs modern humans in the Americas 15,000 years ago.

KERA: DNA From Kennewick Man Shows He Was Native American, Says Study With SMU Ties

Scultpted bust 400x300KERA News reporter Justin Martin interviewed SMU anthropologist David Meltzer from the SMU Department of Anthropology about the controversial 8,500-year-old skeleton called Kennewick Man. Meltzer was part of a new study in the journal Nature that analyzed Kennewick Man's genome sequence and found that Kennewick Man is more closely related to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide.

Kennewick Man: genome sequence of 8,500-year-old skeleton solves scientific controversy

Scultpted bust 400x300An 8,500-year-old male skeleton discovered in 1996 in Washington State sparked bitter disputes between Native Americans, American scientists, and within the American scientific community. Earlier studies suggested he was not ancestral to Native Americans, blocking repatriation. Now his genome sequence shows Kennewick Man is more closely related to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide.

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