Cox School of Business

Post-Gazette: Bearing an eternal summer: Marketers target people’s mind-set, not age

The research of Thomas E. Barry, vice president for executive affairs at SMU and professor of marketing in the Edwin L. Cox School of Business, was featured in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The Oct. 14 feature story “Marketers target people’s mind-set, not age” by journalist Teresa F. Lindeman explores the concept “you’re as old as you feel.”
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Salon: What baseball tells us about racism

md_horiz.jpgBest-selling author, syndicated columnist and progressive talk-radio host David Sirota has covered the research of SMU’s Dr. Johan Sulaeman, an expert in labor economics and discrimination. The article published in the Sept. 30 issue of Salon.

An assistant professor of finance in the Cox School of Business, Sulaeman and his co-authors analyzed 3.5 million Major League Baseball pitches and found that racial/ethnic bias by home plate umpires lowers the performance of Major League’s minority pitchers, diminishing their pay compared to white pitchers.

The study found that minority pitchers reacted to umpire bias by playing it safe with the pitches they throw in a way that actually harmed their performance.
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In These Times: How Baseball Explains Modern Racism

phpThumb_generated_thumbnailjpg.jpegBest-selling author, syndicated columnist and progressive talk-radio host David Sirota has covered the research of SMU’s Dr. Johan Sulaeman, an expert in labor economics and discrimination. The article published in the Sept. 30 issue of In These Times.

An assistant professor of finance in the Cox School of Business, Sulaeman and his co-authors analyzed 3.5 million Major League Baseball pitches and found that racial/ethnic bias by home plate umpires lowers the performance of Major League’s minority pitchers, diminishing their pay compared to white pitchers.

The study found that minority pitchers reacted to umpire bias by playing it safe with the pitches they throw in a way that actually harmed their performance.
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Dallas Morning News: Economic Freedom is Waning in the United States

Economic%20Freedom%20c400x300.jpgDallas Morning News editorial writer Jim Mitchell has written about the research of SMU economist Robert Lawson, co-author on the new report Economic Freedom of the World: 2011 Annual Report.

Lawson is the Jerome M. Fullinwider Chair in Economic Freedom in the O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom at the SMU Cox School of Business.

The research shows that the average economic freedom score fell to its lowest in nearly three decades, with the United States in particular dropping from No. 6 to No. 10.
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Report: U.S. Economic Freedom Continues Fall; Global Average Declines

Levels of economic freedom have decreased around the globe, says SMU economist Robert Lawson, co-author on the new report Economic Freedom of the World: 2011 Annual Report.

The research shows that the average economic freedom score fell to its lowest in nearly three decades, with the surprising news being that the United States in particular continues dropping, going this period from No. 6 to No. 10.
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David Sirota Talk Radio: MLB white favoritism lowers minority pitching performance

Umpire%20strike%20400x300.jpgBest-selling author and progressive talk-radio host David Sirota interviewed SMU’s Dr. Johan Sulaeman, an expert in labor economics and discrimination.

An assistant professor of finance in the Cox School of Business, Sulaeman and his co-authors analyzed 3.5 million Major League Baseball pitches and found that racial/ethnic bias by home plate umpires lowers the performance of Major League’s minority pitchers, diminishing their pay compared to white pitchers.

The study found that minority pitchers reacted to umpire bias by playing it safe with the pitches they throw in a way that actually harmed their performance.
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White favoritism by Major League umps lowers minority pitcher performance, pay

Umpire%20strike%20400x300.jpgRacial/ethnic bias by home plate umpires lowers the performance of Major League’s minority pitchers, diminishing their pay compared to white pitchers, says a new study by economist Johan Sulaeman, Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

The study found that minority pitchers reacted to umpire bias by playing it safe with the pitches they throw in a way that actually harmed their performance.
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US News & World Report: Advertising Can Warp Your Memory

American-magazines-400x300-web.jpgScience writer Chris Gorski has covered the research of Priyali Rajagopal, an assistant professor of marketing in Cox School of Business.

Priyali and Nicole Montgomery, an assistant professor of marketing at College of William and Mary have reported findings in which people who read vivid print advertisements for fictitious products actually come to believe they’ve tried those products. Continue reading

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Scientific American: Ads Convince Consumers of Nonexistent Experiences

American-magazines-400x300-web.jpgScience writer Christopher Intagliata has covered the research of Priyali Rajagopal, an assistant professor of marketing in Cox School of Business.

Priyali and Nicole Montgomery, an assistant professor of marketing at College of William and Mary have reported findings in which people who read vivid print advertisements for fictitious products actually come to believe they’ve tried those products. Continue reading

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