The Globe and Mail: In perfect asymmetry

Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education & Human Development

The Globe and Mail: In perfect asymmetry

Journalist Rachel Brady referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "In perfect asymmetry" published Aug. 18, 2016.

The Roar: Humans can’t bolt much faster than Usain — What science says about the 100m world record

Sports writer Matt Porter referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Humans can't bolt much faster than Usain: What science says about the 100m world record" published Aug. 15, 2016.

Students grasp abstract math concepts after they demonstrate them with arm motions

Now researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a model using geometry proofs that shows potential for wide adoption — a video game in which students make movements with their arms to learn abstract math concepts.

Good news! You’re likely burning more calories than you thought

Counting calories burned is popular, but leading standardized equations used to predict or estimate calories burned while walking assume that one size fits all. They’ve been in place for close to half a century and were based on data from a limited number of people. A new SMU study found that under firm, level ground conditions, the leading standards are relatively inaccurate and have significant bias — predicting too few calories burned in 97 percent of cases researchers examined.

Capital Public Radio: California Sixth-Grade Textbooks Frame Climate Change As Uncertain

California, study, climate change, sixth grade, textbooks, SMU, Stanford, Public radio, sacramentoCapital Public Radio in Sacramento, Calif., covered new research co-authored by SMU teaching expert Diego Román. The new study measured how four sixth-grade science textbooks adopted for use in California frame the subject of global warming. Sixth grade is the first time California state standards indicate students will encounter climate change in their formal science curriculum.

Stanford U press release: Textbooks inaccurately present science on climate change as uncertain and doubtful

study, climate change, textbooks, 6th graders, Diego Roman, SMU, StanfordStanford University issued a press release about new research co-authored by SMU teaching expert Diego Román. The new study measured how four sixth-grade science textbooks adopted for use in California frame the subject of global warming. Sixth grade is the first time California state standards indicate students will encounter climate change in their formal science curriculum.

The Guardian: California public school textbooks mislead students on climate, study says

The Guardian, climate change, textbooks, 6th graders, Diego Roman, SMU, StanfordThe Guardian has covered the research of SMU teaching expert Diego Román co-author of a new study on California 6th grade science textbooks and how they frame the subject of climate change. The new study measured how four sixth-grade science textbooks adopted for use in California frame the subject of global warming. Sixth grade is when California standards indicate students encounter climate change in their science curriculum.

California 6th grade science books: Climate change a matter of opinion not scientific fact

If American teens are unsure about climate change, some school textbooks aren’t helping, says an SMU teaching expert who co-authored a new study on the subject. While the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change — 600 climate researchers in 32 countries reporting changes to Earth’s atmosphere, ice and seas — points to “human influence on the climate system,” that's not what some California students are taught.

Reading ability soars if young struggling readers get school’s intensive help immediately

struggling readers, wait to fail, intensive intervention, SMU, AlOtaiba, YovanoffReading skills improve very little when schools follow the current standard practice of waiting for struggling readers to fail first before providing them with additional help, say researchers at SMU. The new study found that a dynamic intervention in which struggling readers received the most intensive help immediately, enabled students to significantly outperform their peers who had to wait for additional help.

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