How Stuff Works: Could Humans Break the Two-hour Marathon Barrier?

Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education & Human Development

How Stuff Works: Could Humans Break the Two-hour Marathon Barrier?

How Stuff Works reporter Julia Layton tapped the expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for a news story about the burning question of the limits of human speed and whether — or when — runners will break the two-hour marathon barrier. Weyand explained the biomechanics of human locomotion, particularly as it pertains to fast [...]

KERA News: The Biomechanical Breakdown Of Back Flips On Pogo Sticks

KERA news reporter Courtney Collins tapped the expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for a news story about the extreme pogo stick performers that have captivated fair goers this year at the Texas State Fair. Weyand explained the biomechanics of the high-flying backflips and stunts of the pogo stick gymnasts. The article "The Biomechanical [...]

The Guardian: How fast can we go? The science of the 100m sprint

Weyand, The Guardian, Usain Bolt, human speed, sprint, running, OlympicsJournalist Simon Usborne tapped the human-speed expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the London newspaper The Guardian examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Usborne interviewed Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "How fast can we go? The science of the 100m sprint" published Oct. 3, 2016.

Researchers test blood flow in athletes’ brains to find markers that diagnose concussions

A hard hit to the head typically prompts physicians to look for signs of a concussion based on symptoms such as forgetfulness, wobbly gait and disorientation. But symptoms such as those are subjective, says physiologist Sushmita Purkayastha, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Now a new study aims to find noninvasive objective indicators to diagnose whether an athlete has suffered a concussion.

Science.mic: Usain Bolt’s Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science

Journalist Kelly Dickerson referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog Science.Mic examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Dickerson quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Usain Bolt's Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science" published Aug. 15, 2016.

The Globe and Mail: In perfect asymmetry

Journalist Rachel Brady referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "In perfect asymmetry" published Aug. 18, 2016.

The Roar: Humans can’t bolt much faster than Usain — What science says about the 100m world record

Sports writer Matt Porter referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Humans can't bolt much faster than Usain: What science says about the 100m world record" published Aug. 15, 2016.

Students grasp abstract math concepts after they demonstrate them with arm motions

Walkington, SMU, geometry, proof, arm motions Students who make relevant arm movements while learning can improve their knowledge and retention of math, research has shown. Now researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a model using geometry proofs that shows potential for wide adoption — a video game in which students make movements with their arms to learn abstract math concepts.

Good news! You’re likely burning more calories than you thought

Counting calories burned is popular, but leading standardized equations used to predict or estimate calories burned while walking assume that one size fits all. They’ve been in place for close to half a century and were based on data from a limited number of people. A new SMU study found that under firm, level ground conditions, the leading standards are relatively inaccurate and have significant bias — predicting too few calories burned in 97 percent of cases researchers examined.

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