Many top US scientists wish they had more children, with men especially dissatisfied

Anne E. Lincoln

Many top US scientists wish they had more children, with men especially dissatisfied

Nearly half of all women scientists and one-quarter of male scientists at the nation's top research universities said their career has kept them from having as many children as they had wanted, according to a new study co-authored by SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln.

The study, "Scientists Want More Children," was authored by sociologists Elaine Howard Ecklund of Rice University, Houston, and Anne Lincoln of Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and appears in the current issue of the journal PLoS ONE.

August 8, 2011|Categories: Culture, Society & Family, Researcher news|Tags: , |

Gender gap: Selection bias snubs scholarly achievements of female scientists with fewer awards for research

Femalescientist425x282.jpgPublic domain data on 13 science disciplinary societies found women scientists must confront sexism when competing for scholarly awards, according to a new analysis by SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln.

The analysis found that female scientists are recognized with prizes in their field more often for their service or teaching.

February 17, 2011|Categories: Culture, Society & Family|Tags: , , |

AVMA: Study seeks to explain feminization of veterinary profession

Hall%2C%20calves%20400px%20300px.jpgA Dec. 15 article on the web site of the American Veterinary Medical Association covers the research of SMU sociologist Anne E. Lincoln in which she explains the changing face of veterinary medicine.

An assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at SMU, Lincoln is an expert on how occupations transition from being either male- or female-dominated.

AVMA writer Malinda Larkin notes that Lincoln's research has found that women now dominate the field of veterinary medicine — the result of a nearly 40-year trend that is likely to repeat itself in the fields of medicine and law.

Toronto Star: Male students getting rare as hen’s teeth at Ontario Veterinary College

Toronto%20Star%20image-Colin%20McConnell.jpegA Nov. 27 article in the Toronto Star newspaper cites the research of SMU sociologist Anne E. Lincoln in which she explains the changing face of veterinary medicine.

An assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Lincoln is an expert on how occupations transition from being either male- or female-dominated. Lincoln's research has found that women now dominate the field of veterinary medicine — the result of a nearly 40-year trend that is likely to repeat itself in the fields of medicine and law.

Photo: Dr. Jamie Peng examines a 5-month-old French bulldog at Dr. John Reeve-Newson's veterinary clinic in Toronto on Nov. 19, 2010. (TORONTO STAR/Colin McConnell)

Veterinary medicine shifts to more women, fewer men; pattern will repeat in medicine, law fields

Hall%2C%20calves%20400px%20300px.jpgWomen now dominate veterinary medicine — a development reached after 40 years and likely to repeat itself in the fields of medicine and law, according to the first study of its kind on the feminization of veterinary medicine, says SMU sociologist Anne E. Lincoln.

Photo: Veterinarian Dr. Maureen D. Hall, vaccinates calves in Illinois. (Photo AVMA.)

Inside Higher Ed: Having fewer children hits male scientists hard, finds Anne Lincoln research

Lincoln2.jpgInside Higher Education covered the research of SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln in the Aug. 16 article "Parenthood Gaps and Premiums." Lincoln presented the research in mid-August at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association.

The study, which Lincoln co-authored with Elaine Howard Ecklund of Rice University, examined physicists and biologists in academic careers and various aspects surrounding their marital and family status, including satisfaction with the number of children they have. The study was based on a survey of faculty members at the 20 top-ranked graduate programs in both physics and biology, according to the article.

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