Anne E. Lincoln

Txchnologist: Are Women’s Scientific Achievements Being Overlooked?

The Txchnologist blog covered the research of SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln. In a July 5 entry, writer Joseph Castro discusses Lincoln’s latest findings surrounding discrimination against women in the STEM fields: science, technology, engineering and math. Dubbed “the Mathilda Effect,” Lincoln has shown that women in the STEM areas do not receive the same recognition for their research and achievements as do men in those fields. Continue reading

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Scientists face barriers to engaging with public, but still participate in outreach

Although scientists face a number of significant barriers to public outreach, some still engage in these activities, especially women and those with children, according to work published May 9 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. The study authors found that having children was positively correlated with participation in outreach activities; most of the activities study participants were involved in targeted school-aged children. Continue reading

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USA Today: Women scientists lose out on research prizes


USA Today’s “ScienceFair” blog has covered the research of SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln. In a March 13 entry, journalist Dan Vergano writes about Lincoln’s latest findings surrounding discrimination against women in the STEM fields: science, technology, engineering and math.

Dubbed “the Mathilda Effect,” Lincoln has shown that women in the STEM areas do not receive the same recognition for their research and achievements as do men in those fields. Continue reading

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Inside Higher Ed: NSF Aims For Family Friendly Science

sciencecareer.jpgInside Higher Ed cites the research of SMU’s Anne Lincoln in a Sept. 27 article announcing new efforts by the National Science Foundation to make research grants more accessible to female scientists.

The move by the NSF is an effort to stem the tide of female scientists fleeing the fields of science, technology, engineering and math when forced to choose between their career and motherhood.

Lincoln, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology, has done extensive research on how science careers can be incompatible with both women and men who also want to have a family.
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The Atlantic: Being a College Professor Isn’t All It’s Cracked Up to Be

Lincoln%2C%20college%20prof.jpgThe Atlantic has covered the research of SMU’s Anne Lincoln, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology. The article “Being a College Professor Isn’t All It’s Cracked Up to Be” was published Aug. 10 in the online edition of the The Atlantic.

Lincoln’s study found that nearly half of all women scientists and one-quarter of male scientists at the nation’s top research universities said their career has kept them from having as many children as they had wanted. The study, “Scientists Want More Children,” appears in the current issue of the journal PLoS ONE.
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Wall Street Journal: Is Science Incompatible With Family?

juggle_GMdaycare_D_20090318110547.jpgThe Wall Street Journal has covered the research of SMU’s Anne Lincoln, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology. The article “Is Science Incompatible With Family?” was published Aug. 9 in the online edition of the WSJ.

The research found that nearly half of all women scientists and one-quarter of male scientists at the nation’s top research universities said their career has kept them from having as many children as they had wanted. The study, “Scientists Want More Children,” appears in the current issue of the journal PLoS ONE.
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Time: Scientists — “We want more children”

sciencecareer.jpgScience journalist Tara Thean has covered the research of SMU’s Anne Lincoln, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology. The article “Scientists: We want more children” was published Aug. 9 in the online edition of Time.

The research found that nearly half of all women scientists and one-quarter of male scientists at the nation’s top research universities said their career has kept them from having as many children as they had wanted. The study, “Scientists Want More Children,” appears in the current issue of the journal PLoS ONE.
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Many top US scientists wish they had more children, with men especially dissatisfied

Nearly half of all women scientists and one-quarter of male scientists at the nation’s top research universities said their career has kept them from having as many children as they had wanted, according to a new study co-authored by SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln.

The study, “Scientists Want More Children,” was authored by sociologists Elaine Howard Ecklund of Rice University, Houston, and Anne Lincoln of Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and appears in the current issue of the journal PLoS ONE.
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British Veterinary Association journal: Sex and the profession

Hall%2C%20calves%20400px%20300px.jpgVeterinary Record, the journal of the British Veterinary Association, covers the research of SMU sociologist Anne E. Lincoln in which she explains the changing face of veterinary medicine.

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