Alicia E. Meuret

Medscape: Panic Attacks Don’t Come Out of the Blue After All

Electrodes%202%20684.jpgMedscape, the medical blog serving physicians and the healthcare community, has covered the research of SMU psychologist Dr. Alicia Meuret showing panic attacks that seem to strike out-of-the-blue are not without warning after all.

Meuret’s study found significant physiological instability one hour before patients reported feeling a panic attack. The findings suggest potentially new treatments for panic, and re-examination of other “unexpected” medical problems, including seizures, strokes and manic episodes, says Meuret, an assistant professor in the SMU Department of Psychology. She was lead researcher on the study. Dr. David Rosenfield, an associate professor in SMU’s Department of Psychology, was lead statistician.

Continue reading

Posted in Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain, Researcher news, SMU In The News | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

UPI: Panic attacks may be predictable

Electrodes%202%20684.jpgThe wire service UPI has covered the research of SMU psychologist Dr. Alicia Meuret showing panic attacks that seem to strike out-of-the-blue are not without warning after all.

Meuret’s study found significant physiological instability one hour before patients reported feeling a panic attack. The findings suggest potentially new treatments for panic, and re-examination of other “unexpected” medical problems, including seizures, strokes and manic episodes, says Meuret, an assistant professor in the SMU Department of Psychology. She was lead researcher on the study. Dr. David Rosenfield, an associate professor in SMU’s Department of Psychology, was lead statistician.

Continue reading

Posted in SMU In The News, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Out-of-the-blue panic attacks aren’t without warning; data show subtle changes before patients’ aware of attack

Panic attacks that seem to strike out-of-the-blue are not without warning after all, says psychologist Alicia Meuret, Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

A new study found significant physiological instability for at least one hour before patients reported feeling a panic attack, Meuret says, suggesting new treatments for panic, seizures, strokes and manic episodes.
Continue reading

Posted in Economics & Statistics, Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain, Technology, Videos | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The Wall Street Journal: Help for Hyperventilating

Meuret%20400x300%2072dpi.jpgA new treatment that helps people with panic disorder normalize their breathing works better to reduce panic symptoms and hyperventilation than traditional cognitive therapy, says SMU psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

Shirley S. Wang, a health reporter for The Wall Street Jounal, interviewed the SMU psychology department’s Meuret for an article about her research findings that the feeling of suffocation that comes with panic attacks can be alleviated by breathing less — not more. The Feb. 8 article “Help for Hyperventilating” tells readers that deep breathing reduces carbon dioxide in the system, which in turn increases hyperventilation — that scary feeling of suffocating.
Continue reading

Posted in SMU In The News, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Cosmopolitan: Feeling stressed and panicked? Don’t take a deep breath!

Meuret%20400x300%2072dpi.jpgA new treatment that helps people with panic disorder normalize their breathing works better to reduce panic symptoms and hyperventilation than traditional cognitive therapy, says SMU psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

Cosmopolitan magazine has taken note of Meuret’s research with a Jan. 3 article that warns readers to forget about taking a deep breath when they’re feeling stressed and hyperventilating — it will only make the problem worse.
Continue reading

Posted in Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain, Researcher news, SMU In The News | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Live Science: Less is more when breathing to relieve panic

Meuret%20400x300%2072dpi.jpgA new treatment that helps people with panic disorder normalize their breathing works better to reduce panic symptoms and hyperventilation than traditional cognitive therapy, says SMU psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

Live Science news site interviewed the SMU psychology department’s Meuret for an article about her research findings that the feeling of suffocation that comes with panic attacks can be alleviated by breathing less — not more. The Dec. 26 article “To Stave Off Panic, Don’t Take a Deep Breath
” tells readers that deep breathing reduces carbon dioxide in the system, which in turn causes symptoms like dizziness and numbness.

Continue reading

Posted in Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain, Researcher news, SMU In The News | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A new breathing therapy reduces panic and anxiety by reversing hyperventilation

Meuret%20400x300%2072dpi.jpgA new treatment that helps people with panic disorder normalize their breathing works better to reduce panic symptoms and hyperventilation than traditional cognitive therapy, says SMU psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

Photo: Dr. Alicia Meuret demonstrates the CART breathing technique. (Credit: Hillsman Jackson)
Continue reading

Posted in Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain, Videos | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Breathing technique can reduce frequency, severity of asthma attacks

Mueret10%2C-9-09%2Clr.jpgAs the health care reform debate turns to cutting costs and improving treatment outcomes, two SMU professors are expanding a study that shows promise for reducing both the expense and suffering associated with chronic asthma.

Thomas Ritz and Alicia Meuret, both of SMU’s Psychology Department, have developed a four-week program to teach asthmatics how to better control their condition by changing the way they breathe.
Continue reading

Posted in Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Deep breathing worsens panic-attack symptoms

Alicia-Meuret.jpgSouthern Methodist University psychology professor Alicia Meuret proves conventional wisdom is dead wrong: A person suffering a panic attack who tries deep breathing to calm themselves only increases his or her level of hyperventilation and overall panic-related symptoms.

Meuret’s solution? Self-training to expel lesser amounts of carbon dioxide using a hand-held, biofeedback device results in the ability to normalize breathing and avoid hyperventilation.
Continue reading

Posted in Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain | Tagged , , | Leave a comment