Prevention: Anxiety Is Draining Your Brain, But It Doesn’t Have To

Alicia E. Meuret

Prevention: Anxiety Is Draining Your Brain, But It Doesn’t Have To

Health journalist Markham Heid wrote about the groundbreaking panic and anxiety research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret and Dr. Thomas Ritz in the June 2012 issue of Prevention magazine. The article "Anxiety Is Draining Your Brain, But It Doesn't Have To" cites Meuret's anxiety research disputing the standard advice to "take a deep breath."

Baylor Innovations: Don’t Panic, New Research Shows That Panic Attacks Are Not As Spontaneous As Once Thought

The%20Wall%20Street%20Journal.jpgBaylor Innovations, the quarterly magazine of Baylor Health Care System, featured the groundbreaking panic attack research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret, Dr. David Rosenfield and Dr. Thomas Ritz. The Spring 2012 article by health and science writer Mark Cantrell, titled "Don't Panic: New Research Shows That Panic Attacks Are Not As Spontaneous As Once Thought" details the startling findings of Meuret's published study showing significant physiological instability in advance of so-called out-of-the-blue panic attacks.

SMU News: 2012 Research Day at Southern Methodist University

2012 SMU Research DaySMU News covered the annual 2012 Research Day on Feb. 10 where SMU graduate and undergraduate students presented results of their research studies. Sponsored by SMU's Office of Research and Graduate Studies, the event sought to foster communication between students in different programs, give students the opportunity to present their work in formats they will use as professionals, and to share with the SMU community and others the outstanding research being done at the University.

HHS Healthbeat: Predicting Panic Attacks

Panic%20attack.jpgNicholas Garlow with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services created a podcast about the groundbreaking panic attack research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret, Dr. David Rosenfield and Dr. Thomas Ritz.

The Sept. 22 podcast "Predicting Panic Attacks" details the startling findings of Meuret's newest published study showing significant physiological instability in advance of so-called out-of-the-blue panic attacks.

Read the text.

Listen to the podcast.

The Wall Street Journal: Seeing Signs of a Panic Attack Before One Happens

The%20Wall%20Street%20Journal.jpgScience journalist Ann Lukits wrote about the groundbreaking panic attack research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret, Dr. David Rosenfield and Dr. Thomas Ritz in the The Wall Street Journal. The Sept. 20 article "Seeing Signs of a Panic Attack Before One Happens" details the startling findings of Meuret's newest published study showing significant physiological instability in advance of so-called out-of-the-blue panic attacks.

The Atlantic: The Upside of a Panic Attack: The Worst Is Over Before You Know It

main%20flickr%20Bhernandez%202917293212_9dac1fe52e_b-thumb-615x300-63565.jpgScience journalist Hans Villarica wrote about the groundbreaking panic attack research of SMU psychologists Dr. Alicia Meuret, Dr. David Rosenfield and Dr. Thomas Ritz in the The Atlantic.

The Sept. 16 article "The Upside of a Panic Attack: The Worst Is Over Before You Know It" details the startling findings of Meuret's newest published study showing significant physiological instability in advance of so-called out-of-the-blue panic attacks.

Patch: Panic Attack — It May Not Be a Sneak Attack After All

ae6248458d8d60fc6a7637de7dc092fe.jpegThe nationally distributed online community news service Patch.com has covered the research of SMU psychologist Dr. Alicia Meuret, which found that panic attacks that seem to strike out-of-the-blue are not without warning after all.

Meuret's study found significant physiological instability one hour before patients reported feeling a panic attack. The findings suggest potentially new treatments for panic, and re-examination of other "unexpected" medical problems, including seizures, strokes and manic episodes, says Meuret, an assistant professor in the SMU Department of Psychology. She was lead researcher on the study. Dr. David Rosenfield, an associate professor in SMU's Department of Psychology, was lead statistician.

Medscape: Panic Attacks Don’t Come Out of the Blue After All

Electrodes%202%20684.jpgMedscape, the medical blog serving physicians and the healthcare community, has covered the research of SMU psychologist Dr. Alicia Meuret showing panic attacks that seem to strike out-of-the-blue are not without warning after all.

Meuret's study found significant physiological instability one hour before patients reported feeling a panic attack. The findings suggest potentially new treatments for panic, and re-examination of other "unexpected" medical problems, including seizures, strokes and manic episodes, says Meuret, an assistant professor in the SMU Department of Psychology. She was lead researcher on the study. Dr. David Rosenfield, an associate professor in SMU's Department of Psychology, was lead statistician.

UPI: Panic attacks may be predictable

Electrodes%202%20684.jpgThe wire service UPI has covered the research of SMU psychologist Dr. Alicia Meuret showing panic attacks that seem to strike out-of-the-blue are not without warning after all.

Meuret's study found significant physiological instability one hour before patients reported feeling a panic attack. The findings suggest potentially new treatments for panic, and re-examination of other "unexpected" medical problems, including seizures, strokes and manic episodes, says Meuret, an assistant professor in the SMU Department of Psychology. She was lead researcher on the study. Dr. David Rosenfield, an associate professor in SMU's Department of Psychology, was lead statistician.

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