Department of Defense awards $2.6 million to SMU STEM program for minority students


Department of Defense awards $2.6 million to SMU STEM program for minority students

SMU STEMPREP, Simmons, minority students,The U.S. Department of Defense recently awarded the STEMPREP Program at SMU a $2.6 million grant to support its goal of increasing the number of minorities in STEM fields. STEMPREP recruits bright, science-minded minority middle school students for the two-summer classroom phase of STEMPREP, then provides high school students with summer opportunities at research labs.

Business Insider: Your Smartphone Is Destroying Your Sleep

insomnia 220x170Business Insider Science Editor Jennifer Walsh tapped the sleep expertise of SMU Assistant Professor of Chemistry Brian D. Zoltowski to explain how artificial light from our smartphones and other digital devices causes sleep deprivation. Her article, "Your Smartphone Is Destroying Your Sleep," published May 19. Zoltowski’s lab at SMU studies one of the many proteins involved in an organism’s circadian clocks. Called a photoreceptor, the protein responds to light to predict time of day and season by measuring day length.

Low IQ students learn to read at 1st-grade level after persistent, intensive instruction

Allor, SMU, reading, Low IQ, intellectual disabilitiesThe findings of a pioneering four-year educational study offer hope for thousands of children identified with intellectual disability or low IQ who have very little, if any, reading ability. The study by researchers at Southern Methodist University is the first large-scale longitudinal study of its kind to demonstrate the reading potential of students with intellectual disability or low IQ. It was funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

Richest marine reptile fossil bed along Africa’s South Atlantic coast is dated at 71.5 mya

Angola, SMU, Strganac, Projecto PaleoAngolaPaleontologists at Southern Methodist University have measured the carbon isotopes in marine fossils from Bentiaba, Angola to precisely date for the first time 30 million years of sediments along Africa’s South Atlantic shoreline. They dated the richest marine reptile fossil bed along Africa's South Atlantic to 71.5 million years ago.

NOvA experiment glimpses neutrinos, one of nature’s most abundant, and elusive particles

NOvA, SMU, Tom Coan, neutrinos 400x300Scientists hunting one of nature’s most elusive, yet abundant, elementary particles announced today they’ve succeeded in their first efforts to glimpse neutrinos using a detector in Minnesota. Neutrinos are generated in nature through the decay of radioactive elements and from high-energy collisions between fundamental particles, such as in the Big Bang that ignited the universe.

USA Today: Bitcoin tumbles after China crackdown

Bitcoin Tyler Moore SMU USA TodayJournalists Alistair Barr and Kim Hjelmgaard with USA Today tapped the expertise of SMU Bitcoin and cybersecurity expert Tyler W. Moore, an assistant professor of computer science in the Lyle School of Engineering. Moore's expertise draws in part on his research that found that online money exchanges that trade hard currency for the rapidly emerging cyber money known as Bitcoin have a 45 percent chance of failing — often taking their customers’ money with them.

New fossil species discovered in Mozambique reveals new data on ancient mammal relatives

A female Niassodon mfumukasi protecting its calf in its natural environment by the end of the Permian (~256Ma). Illustrated by Fernando Correia.‬

A female Niassodon mfumukasi protecting its calf in its natural environment by the end of the Permian (~256Ma). Illustrated by Fernando Correia.‬

A new species and genus of fossil vertebrate has been identified from the remote province of Niassa in Mozambique, according to an international team of paleontologists. The species is a distant relative of living mammals and is approximately 256 million years old, the researchers reported Dec. 4 in the scientific journal PLoS ONE.

Chemical probe confirms that body makes its own rotten egg gas, H2S, to benefit health

H2S 220x180A new study confirms directly what scientists previously knew only indirectly: The poisonous “rotten egg” gas hydrogen sulfide is generated by our body's growing cells. Hydrogen sulfide, or H2S, in small amounts plays a role in cardiovascular health. In the new study, chemists developed a chemical probe that reacts and lights up when live human cells generate hydrogen sulfide, says SMU's Alexander R. Lippert.

Study finds that newlyweds who are satisfied with marriage are more likely to gain weight

Andrea Meltzer, newlyweds, weight gain, SMUOn average, young newlyweds who are satisfied with their marriage gain weight in the early years after they exchange vows. That's the finding of a new study on marital satisfaction and weight gain, according to psychologist Andrea L. Meltzer, lead researcher and assistant professor in the SMU Department of Psychology.

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