Real Simple: This Is the Best Time of Day to See Your Therapist

Researcher news

Real Simple: This Is the Best Time of Day to See Your Therapist

If you’re struggling to overcome anxiety or a phobia, you’ll want to schedule a session at this time. Real Simple health writer Amanda MacMillan covered the research of SMU clinical psychologist Alicia Meuret in the latest issue of the magazine and web site. The article, "This Is the Best Time of Day to See Your [...]

KERA News: The Biomechanical Breakdown Of Back Flips On Pogo Sticks

KERA news reporter Courtney Collins tapped the expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for a news story about the extreme pogo stick performers that have captivated fair goers this year at the Texas State Fair. Weyand explained the biomechanics of the high-flying backflips and stunts of the pogo stick gymnasts. The article "The Biomechanical [...]

Fox News: Mysterious Pacific island burial site is older than thought, study says

"Nan Madol represents a first in Pacific Island history. The tomb of the first chiefs of Pohnpei is a century older than similar monumental burials of leaders on other islands." — Mark McCoy, SMU Science reporter Rob Verger covered the research discovery that new dating on the stone buildings of the ancient monumental city of [...]

Evidence of first chief indicates Pacific islanders invented a new society on city they built of coral and basalt

SMU archaeologist Mark McCoy's new analysis of the chief’s tomb of Nan Madol suggests the island’s monumental structures are the earliest evidence of a chiefdom in the Pacific — yielding new keys to how societies emerge and evolve

Polity Immigration and Society Series: Gender and Migration

"Gender and Migration" is encyclopedic in nature and an essential resource for anyone interested in immigration, gender or both. — Nancy Foner, Hunter College Gender roles, relations, and ideologies are major aspects of migration. In a timely book on the subject, SMU anthropologist Caroline B. Brettell argues that understanding gender relations is vital to a [...]

Research: Women hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science

Work life in academia might sound like a dream: summers off, year-long sabbaticals, the opportunity to switch between classroom teaching and research. Yet, when it comes to the sciences, life at the top U.S. research universities is hardly idyllic. Based on surveys of over 2,000 junior and senior scientists, both male and female, as well as in-depth interviews, the new book "Failing Families, Failing Science" by SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln and Rice University sociologist Elaine Howard Ecklund examines how the rigors of a career in academic science makes it especially difficult to balance family and work.

Times Higher Education: How work and family life conflict in the modern university

Academic science still operates on assumptions that have failed to catch up with the realities of today’s family lives, argue scholars Times Higher Education covered the new book of SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln in a Sept. 29 article "How work and family life conflict in the modern university." The book, Failing Families, Failing Science (NYU Press, [...]

The Guardian: How fast can we go? The science of the 100m sprint

Weyand, The Guardian, Usain Bolt, human speed, sprint, running, OlympicsJournalist Simon Usborne tapped the human-speed expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the London newspaper The Guardian examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Usborne interviewed Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "How fast can we go? The science of the 100m sprint" published Oct. 3, 2016.

Researchers test blood flow in athletes’ brains to find markers that diagnose concussions

A hard hit to the head typically prompts physicians to look for signs of a concussion based on symptoms such as forgetfulness, wobbly gait and disorientation. But symptoms such as those are subjective, says physiologist Sushmita Purkayastha, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Now a new study aims to find noninvasive objective indicators to diagnose whether an athlete has suffered a concussion.

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