Research: Women hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science

Learning & Education

Research: Women hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science

Work life in academia might sound like a dream: summers off, year-long sabbaticals, the opportunity to switch between classroom teaching and research. Yet, when it comes to the sciences, life at the top U.S. research universities is hardly idyllic. Based on surveys of over 2,000 junior and senior scientists, both male and female, as well as in-depth interviews, the new book "Failing Families, Failing Science" by SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln and Rice University sociologist Elaine Howard Ecklund examines how the rigors of a career in academic science makes it especially difficult to balance family and work.

Psychotherapy sessions are best in the morning when levels of helpful hormone are high

Patients make more progress toward overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when their therapy sessions are scheduled in the morning, new research suggests. An SMU study found that morning sessions helped psychotherapy patients overcome their panic and anxiety and phobic avoidance better, in part, because levels of cortisol — a naturally occurring hormone — are at their highest then, said clinical psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

NPR: How Domestic Violence In One Home Affects Every Child In A Class

bear-vs-girl1_slide-eec6137db10039983a91f4997472ca67ed44e0c6-s800-c85NPR journalist Gabrielle Emanuel covered the research of SMU government policy expert Elira Kuka for All Things Considered on NPR as part of its series "The Mental Health Crisis In Our Schools." The segment examined the impact on an entire school classroom when one student is victimized by domestic violence at home. Kuka, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics, and her colleagues found that new data shows violence in the home hinders the academic performance not only of the student who is abused, but also of their classmates, too.

SMU biochemists, students probe membrane proteins that thwart cancer chemotherapies

Each semester, SMU biology professors Pia Vogel and John Wise welcome a handful of dedicated and curious students to their lab in the SMU Dedman Life Sciences building. The SMU undergraduate students and Dallas-area high school students get hands-on experience working on cancer research in the combined SMU Department of Biological Sciences laboratories of Wise and Vogel.

Study: Impoverished students and black students suffer greater impact from closure of Houston schools

School closures disproportionately displace poor and black students, according to a new study from researchers at Southern Methodist University and Rice University’s Houston Education Research Consortium. In a look at the Houston Independent School District’s school closures between 2003 and 2010, researchers found that schools with a higher proportion of black students were particularly likely to be targeted by closures, said education policy researcher Meredith Richards, co-author of the study and assistant professor in the Department of Education Policy and Leadership at SMU, Dallas.

Students grasp abstract math concepts after they demonstrate them with arm motions

Walkington, SMU, geometry, proof, arm motions Students who make relevant arm movements while learning can improve their knowledge and retention of math, research has shown. Now researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a model using geometry proofs that shows potential for wide adoption — a video game in which students make movements with their arms to learn abstract math concepts.

Science Magazine: Research identifies keys to managing scientists, engineers

Science Magazine covered the research of provost and vice president for academic affairs Steven Currall, also professor of management and organization at SMU's Cox School of Business, a co-author on research about how leaders can manage innovators to retain them in their organization. Study co-authors include Sara Perry, assistant professor of management in Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business, and Emily Hunter, associate professor of management at Hankamer.

Wildfire on warming planet requires adaptive capacity at local, national, int’l scales

Industrialized nations that view wildfire as the enemy have much to learn from people in some parts of the world who have learned to live compatibly with wildfire, says a team of fire research scientists. The interdisciplinary team say there is much to be learned from these “fire-adaptive communities” and they are calling on policy makers to tap that knowledge, particularly in the wake of global warming.

New York Daily News: Shocking viral video of 5-year-old boy being paddled

The New York Daily News quoted SMU Psychology Professor George W. Holden, psychology, for his expertise on spanking in an article about a Georgia principal paddling a 5-year-old boy as punishment. The paddling was caught on video and went viral on the Internet by viewers who were horrified and shocked. The article, "Shocking viral video of 5-year-old boy being paddled shines light on legal but 'damaging' corporal punishment," published April 15, 2016.

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