ESPN: How have players become so big and so fast?

Health & Medicine

ESPN: How have players become so big and so fast?

SMU physiologist and biomechanics researcher Peter G. Weyand was quoted by ESPN writer Josh Moyer in the reporter's Big Ten Blog for an article about the evolution of the speed and size of college football players. Weyand leads the SMU Locomotor Performance Laboratory and is recognized worldwide as an expert in human running performance and the locomotion of humans and other terrestrial animals.

Daily Mail: Fretting over your weight? You may be ready for a baby

Meltzer, peak fertility, weight gain, SMULondon's Daily Mail newspaper reported on the research of SMU social psychologist Andrea L. Meltzer, who was lead author on three independent studies that found biology isn’t the only reason women eat less as they near ovulation, a time when they are at their peak fertility. The studies found that another part of the equation is a woman’s desire to maintain her body’s attractiveness, says Meltzer.

At peak fertility, women who desire to maintain body attractiveness report they eat less

SMU, Meltzer, ovulation, weight loss, women, attractivenessBiology isn’t the only reason women eat less as they near ovulation, a time when they are at their peak fertility. Three new independent studies found that another part of the equation is a woman’s desire to maintain her body’s attractiveness, says social psychologist and assistant professor Andrea L. Meltzer, Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

Outside Magazine: Inside the Effort to Crack the Sub-Two Hour Marathon

A bold, scientist-backed effort to achieve the impossible within the next five years may benefit all runners—even if the goal remains a moonshot. The work of SMU physiologist and biomechanics researcher Peter G. Weyand was featured in an article in Outside Magazine about an international scientific collaboration's effort to crack the sub-two hour marathon. Weyand [...]

Public News Service: Hug it out — experts warn against physically punishing children

Holden, psychology, SMU, spanking, parenting, corporal punishment, discipline Public News Service quoted SMU Psychology Professor George W. Holden, psychology, as an expert source in the article "Hug it Out: Experts Warn Against Physically Punishing Children" about a new study from Duke University that warns against resorting to physical punishment. Holden is a leading expert on parenting, discipline and family violence. He strongly advocates against corporal punishment and cites overwhelming research, including his own, that has demonstrated that spanking is not only ineffective, but also harmful to children, and many times leads to child abuse.

$2.5 million awarded to Retina Foundation and SMU Lyle to study macular degeneration

SMU, Retina foundation, macular degenerationThe Retina Foundation of the Southwest and SMU’s Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering will collaborate to create the Clinical Center of Innovation for Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Supported by a $2.5 million grant award from the W. W. Caruth, Jr. Foundation at Communities Foundation of Texas (CFT), the center will be housed at the Retina Foundation in Dallas.

January 29, 2015|Categories: Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain, Researcher news, Technology|Tags: |

Raw Story: Teaching girls to say ‘no’ in virtual reality cuts sexual victimization by half — study

sexual victimization, virtual reality, SMU Blogger Scott Kaufman on the Internet news site Raw Story covered the research of SMU clinical psychologist Lorelei Simpson Rowe and her co-authors Ernest N. Jouriles and Renee McDonald.

Teen girls report less sexual victimization after virtual reality assertiveness training

Simpson Rowe, SMU, victimization, sexual coercion, virtual reality, Jouriles, McDonaldTeen girls were less likely to report being sexually victimized after learning to assertively resist unwanted sexual overtures and practicing resistance in a realistic virtual environment, finds a new study. The effects persisted over a three-month period following the training, said clinical psychologist Lorelei Simpson Rowe, lead author on the pilot study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

Load More Posts