Huffington Post: The Science-Backed Reason To See Your Therapist In The Morning

Health & Medicine

Real Simple: This Is the Best Time of Day to See Your Therapist

If you’re struggling to overcome anxiety or a phobia, you’ll want to schedule a session at this time. Real Simple health writer Amanda MacMillan covered the research of SMU clinical psychologist Alicia Meuret in the latest issue of the magazine and web site. The article, "This Is the Best Time of Day to See Your [...]

KERA News: The Biomechanical Breakdown Of Back Flips On Pogo Sticks

KERA news reporter Courtney Collins tapped the expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for a news story about the extreme pogo stick performers that have captivated fair goers this year at the Texas State Fair. Weyand explained the biomechanics of the high-flying backflips and stunts of the pogo stick gymnasts. The article "The Biomechanical [...]

Psychotherapy sessions are best in the morning when levels of helpful hormone are high

Patients make more progress toward overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when their therapy sessions are scheduled in the morning, new research suggests. An SMU study found that morning sessions helped psychotherapy patients overcome their panic and anxiety and phobic avoidance better, in part, because levels of cortisol — a naturally occurring hormone — are at their highest then, said clinical psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

The Guardian: How fast can we go? The science of the 100m sprint

Weyand, The Guardian, Usain Bolt, human speed, sprint, running, OlympicsJournalist Simon Usborne tapped the human-speed expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the London newspaper The Guardian examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Usborne interviewed Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "How fast can we go? The science of the 100m sprint" published Oct. 3, 2016.

NPR: How Domestic Violence In One Home Affects Every Child In A Class

bear-vs-girl1_slide-eec6137db10039983a91f4997472ca67ed44e0c6-s800-c85NPR journalist Gabrielle Emanuel covered the research of SMU government policy expert Elira Kuka for All Things Considered on NPR as part of its series "The Mental Health Crisis In Our Schools." The segment examined the impact on an entire school classroom when one student is victimized by domestic violence at home. Kuka, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics, and her colleagues found that new data shows violence in the home hinders the academic performance not only of the student who is abused, but also of their classmates, too.

Researchers test blood flow in athletes’ brains to find markers that diagnose concussions

A hard hit to the head typically prompts physicians to look for signs of a concussion based on symptoms such as forgetfulness, wobbly gait and disorientation. But symptoms such as those are subjective, says physiologist Sushmita Purkayastha, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Now a new study aims to find noninvasive objective indicators to diagnose whether an athlete has suffered a concussion.

SMU biochemists, students probe membrane proteins that thwart cancer chemotherapies

Each semester, SMU biology professors Pia Vogel and John Wise welcome a handful of dedicated and curious students to their lab in the SMU Dedman Life Sciences building.

Science.mic: Usain Bolt’s Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science

Journalist Kelly Dickerson referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog Science.Mic examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Dickerson quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Usain Bolt's Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science" published Aug. 15, 2016.

Load More Posts